Former NFL MVP in hot water for comments about women who 'don't know when to be quiet'

ARON YOHANNES
oregonlive.com
A close up view of the National Football League logo painted on the field prior to the NFL Super Bowl 56 football game between the Cincinnati Bengals and Los Angeles Rams, Sunday, Feb. 13, 2022, in Inglewood, Calif. (AP Photo/Kyusung Gong)
Cam Newton

Free agent quarterback Cam Newton is facing scrutiny for making a sexist comment regarding women.

During an appearance on Barstool Sports podcast “Million Dollaz Worth of Game,” the veteran quarterback and 2015 NFL MVP shared his opinion of a woman’s role while discussing his childhood.

“I had a perfect, a perfect example of what a man was in my life by my father,” Newton said. “My parents have been together for 36, 37 years now and it’s a beautiful thing. I grew up in a three-parent household. My mom, my father, and my grandmother. And I knew what a woman was, not a bad (expletive).”

Newton was asked to explain the difference between the two.

“A bad (expletive) is a person who is just, you know, ‘Girl, I’m a bad (expletive), I’m doing this, I’m doing that. I look the part but I don’t act that part,’” he said. “And there’s a lot of women who are bad (expletive), and I say (expletive) in a way not to degrade a woman, but just to go off the aesthetic of what they deem is a boss chick.”

Newton continued:

“Now, a woman for me is, handling your own but knowing how to cater to a man’s needs, right? And I think a lot of times when you get that aesthetic of, ‘I’m a boss (expletive), Imma this, Imma that.’ No, baby. But you can’t cook. You don’t know when to be quiet. You don’t know how to allow a man to lead.”

This isn’t the first time Newton has found himself in hot water for negative comments about women. In 2017, when he was the starting quarterback for the Carolina Panthers, Newton made a sexist remark to a female reporter during a news conference. At the time, Panthers beat reporter Jourdan Rodrigue asked Newton about the route running of wide receiver Devin Funchess, which prompted Newton to say, “it’s funny to hear a female talking about routes.”

Newton apologized for those comments, but lost a sponsorship with Dannon.

“After careful thought, I understand that my word choice was extremely degrading and disrespectful to women. And to be honest, that was not my intention,” he said in 2017. “And if you are a person who took offense to what I said, I sincerely apologize.”

Newton’s views about women would surely face even more scrutiny today if he weren’t a free agent — especially at a time when six attorney generals have expressed concerns about workplace culture of women and minorities in the NFL and are currently investigating the league.