Delone Catholic grad Pat Flaherty returns to New York Giants in consulting role

STAFF AND WIRE REPORT
Pat Flaherty

Pat Flaherty has returned to the site of his greatest coaching success.

The Delone Catholic High School graduate has been hired as an offensive/defensive consultant with the New York Giants.

The hiring was announced on the Giants’ website, Giants.com.

During his previous stint with the Giants from 2004 through 2015, Flaherty was the offensive line coach under head coach Tom Coughlin. Flaherty, now 64, won two Super Bowl rings during that stint.

It’s expected that Flaherty’s primary role with the Giants will be working with the offensive line under new Giants offensive line coach Rob Sale.

The Giants are trying to improve their offense, which ranked 31st in the NFL last season.

The Giants ranked dead last in the NFL last season with a 46% pass-block win rate, an advanced metric charted by ESPN Stats & Info. The Giants’ run blocking was about average.

Flaherty was a standout lineman on some powerhouse Delone Catholic teams in the early 1970s before becoming a Little All-American center at East Stroudsburg University.

After his college playing career, he embarked on college and pro coaching career that spans more than four decades.

Praise from McKenzie: Kareem McKenzie, the Giants’ starting right tackle for both Giants championship teams, thinks Flaherty should be able to help improve the Giants’ offensive line.

McKenzie, a former Penn State standout, said the lines on New York’s championship teams were not stacked with high draft picks, but came together under Flaherty and disproved doubters. The line included undrafted center Shaun O’Hara, undrafted guard Rich Seubert, fifth-round left tackle David Diehl and sixth-round guard/center Kevin Boothe among them.

“Looking at those who were there for the bulk of (Flaherty’s) tenure, they weren’t journeymen, but they were players [that outside] people thought wouldn’t hang around long,” McKenzie, 41, a former Jets third-round pick, said recently. “But in that room, we were guys who were dedicated to working collectively to achieving a goal.”

McKenzie said Flaherty brings “attention to detail, motivation and work ethic.”

“Specifically, I remember as a player knowing he was willing to put in as much — if not more — work than his players to make sure they were prepared on Sundays,” McKenzie said. “We did a lot of different things that for me were new, with all the different walk-throughs. All those aspects that you take for granted now, in preparation, a lot of what we accomplished as an offensive line was because of Pat Flaherty.”

All of that should make Flaherty a solid consultant and sounding board for Sale, 41, who is acclimating to his first NFL job from Louisiana Lafayette.

Offensive line turmoil: Flaherty has 2019 Miami Dolphins ties to two members of Joe Judge’s coaching staff, as well: defensive coordinator Pat Graham and QBs coach Jerry Schuplinski.

So there is familiarity inside the franchise and on the coaching staff. The hope is that consistency won’t be far behind entering Year 2 of coordinator Jason Garrett’s offense.

There has been more turmoil with the Giants’ O-line than any position group in the past year.

In February, Sale unofficially became the Giants’ fourth offensive line coach in 14 months following Hal Hunter under Pat Shurmur, and Marc Colombo and DeGuglielmo under Judge.

DeGuglielmo was the Dolphins’ offensive line coach in 2019, promoted only when Miami fired Flaherty in late July, reportedly for failing to implement the Miami’s new system.

Last fall, Judge brought DeGuglielmo to the Giants midseason to consult, only for Garrett’s former Dallas compatriot, Colombo, to take exception and get fired for insubordination.

Then DeGuglielmo’s promotion was fleeting. He left for Louisiana Tech in early February after failing to reach terms with the Giants.

Now Sale and Flaherty take charge of a young, developing line in the early stages of the Giants’ rebuild.

The New York Post, through the TNS news service, contributed to this report.