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Unfortunate circumstances happen to even the best of people.

For Spring Grove rising senior Ellie Glass, however, it seems that misfortune has been finding her more than it should.

Two years ago, Glass sprained an ankle, which sidelined her for nearly two months.

Last year at the end of the regular season, she suffered a concussion that kept her out of the final two regular-season contests as well as a first-round game of the York-Adams League playoffs.

The latest bit of bad news for Glass came the day before Mother’s Day. During an AAU basketball contest in Maryland, Glass came down wrong on her right leg while fighting for a rebound.

The result was certainly not what Glass wanted — it was confirmed that she tore her anterior cruciate ligament. That injury will prevent the Rocket standout from starting the 2019-2020 season on time this December, although she and her coach, Troy Sowers, are both hopeful the 5-foot, 7-inch standout will enjoy a quick recovery.

Memory still fresh: Like a lot of traumatic events, Glass remembers it almost like it happened yesterday.

“I was in a tournament at McDaniel (College) with my AAU team, the Shenanigans,” Glass said. “I remember that I was going up for an offensive rebound, and when I came down, I kind of got hip-checked by one of the girls on the other team. So that caused me to land kind of awkwardly and I ended up hyper-extending my knee.”

Immediately, Glass could only think of the worst. Having heard other players talk about ACL injuries, she suspected she would find herself in the same boat.

The sound that the injury made only solidified her thinking.

“When it happened I heard the pop,” she said. “And that was the first thing that went through my mind when I heard it, was that I tore my ACL.”

Standout performer: Basketball has been a major priority in her life throughout her high school career. A year ago, the York-Adams League Division I second-team all-star was a big reason the Rockets finished 20-10 overall, including 8-4 in York-Adams Division I. Glass averaged 10.8 points per game, good for second on the team, and shot 76.8% from the foul line.

It seems nearly every day of her life has been spent either practicing her skills or playing games.

When she was injured, Glass tried to remain positive, hoping that what she heard was more imaginary than real.

“I didn’t want to think that,” she said of tearing her ACL. “So I kind of stayed down on the ground for a little bit.”

Her mother quickly made her way over to her daughter’s side to find out what happened. That was something that Ellie Glass found to be out of character.

“She normally doesn’t do that,” she said. “But my mom was out on the floor. She knew I was hurt and she asked if I heard a pop and I was like ‘yeah,’ so they helped get me off the court.”

Silver lining: Both Ellie and her mother’s assessments proved to be spot on. Glass was diagnosed with a torn ACL by her doctors at WellSpan two days later. But, in a silver lining of good news, that was the only major injury that Glass suffered.

“I didn’t tear my meniscus or my MCL,” she said. “It was just the ACL. Because of that I was able to have my surgery on May 24. If it was anything more than that I would have had to wait another month or so to get surgery.”

Now, nearly seven weeks since her surgery, Glass is looking forward to completing her road to recovery. She has been working hard in physical therapy to help strengthen her knee and legs. Glass hopes to begin jogging in a few weeks before she is able to again begin to run.

“It’s all going pretty well,” she said. “And my knee, so far, has been healing really nicely.”

Sowers encouraged: Sowers, who took over the program last season, has been encouraged by the news so far from his point guard. He knows that playing with Glass is a lot easier than without her.

“She’s my brain out there on the court,” he said. “She and I kind of think the same thing as the game unfolds, so I really never take her off the court. So it will be tough playing without her, but I know that she’s a hard worker and she’ll rehab it and try to get back in shape and on the court as soon as she can.”

Reach Ryan Vandersloot at sports@yorkdispatch.com.

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