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Area coaches discuss the lack of coaching changes this offseason, and how that's good for the league Elijah Armold

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At 13 seasons, Kevin Myers was the longest-tenured head football coach in York County.

Thirteen years, however, was enough for the Dallastown boss.

On Friday, Nov. 17, Myers handed in his letter of resignation to the school, citing the desire to spend more time with his family as his reason for stepping away from football.

"My daughter is out in Pittsburgh at Duquesne University and there was about a six-week period we didn't get to see her," Myers said. "People can say that I can go out there and travel and be with her, but I wouldn't fully be there. I know myself too well that I'd be back here in Dallastown game-planning."

Myers also said he was simply "tired of being tired" dealing with a job that seemed to require his full attention 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.

Myers' daughter is a sophomore at Duquesne and his son is about to graduate from Dallastown in the spring. Myers said one of his son's school choices is Slippery Rock, which is near Duquesne, and he wants to have the chance to visit his children whenever he can while they're still in school.

"They've made many sacrifices and I've been coaching their entire lives, my son and daughter," Myers said. "I haven't attended a Parent Day out there with (my daughter) and I don't think that's fair to her."

Myers, 43, wouldn't rule out being completely done with football, leaving open the possibility of coming back as an assistant coach down the line. As for being a head coach, that time is over.

Successful tenure: It was a successful run for Myers with the Wildcats.

After spending the first eight years of his coaching career as a volunteer coach at the junior high level and then as an assistant on the varsity staff, Myers took over before the 2005 season.

In that time, Myers has become easily the most accomplished coach in program history. His team's had nine winning seasons during his time, made the District 3 playoffs 10 times and won four York-Adams League Division I titles. 

Dallastown's best years under Myers have been most recently. The Wildcats just completed their fifth consecutive winning season, which included a Division I co-championship with York High. That was the team's third title in the last five seasons.

In his career as a head coach, Myers compiled an 83-60 record.

Dallastown went 8-3 overall this year, 6-1 in D-I and qualified for the District 3 6-A postseason. That season was enough for the coaches around the Y-A League to vote him Division I Coach of the Year.

"I was talking to a coach from (Lebanon Valley College) today and he made a good point, and this is true, when you're in a profession (such) as coaching, it's always good to go out on your own terms," Myers said. "So, that is cool to do that to be able to do it on my own terms."

What's next: Myers didn't enter the season expecting it to be his final one as a head coach, but he said the six-week stretch where he couldn't visit his daughter made the decision obvious.

When he informed his players of his news, he described their reaction as "shocked."

Myers will still be a technology and engineering education teacher at Dallastown, where he plans to stay on for another 15 years until retirement, he said.

Myers, who is a 1992 graduate of Dallastown, said he still expects to be involved with things around the school, just not on the athletic side. At least not for a few years.

Looking ahead to next fall, when he won't be on the sidelines for the first time in more than two decades, Myers already has an idea of how he'll spend his football-free time.

"My wife and I, we're going to take the time to go out to Pittsburgh to see my daughter and possibly my son at Slippery Rock, it's one of the schools he's looking at," he said. "Having that opportunity to do that, go camping in the fall and be able to archery hunt."

Second coaching change: Myers' decision to step down created a second coaching opening in Division I early in the offseason.

Recently, New Oxford informed head coach Greg Bowman that it was opening up the position, according to reports.

Bowman elected not to re-apply for the job, according to reports.

In two seasons, Bowman didn't win a game, with the Colonials going 0-20 under him. Before coaching New Oxford, Bowman helped guide the Northern York football team to a District 3 playoff appearance in 2015.

— Reach Patrick Strohecker at pstrohecker@yorkdispatch.com

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