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After his unceremonious release from the York Revolution in May, former franchise face Corey Thurman couldn't see himself fading away from the game he's always loved and the city he grew to love.

He still can't.

While his focus remains on pitching again at the professional level, Thurman's quest to rekindle his career could have him on the mound again locally in the near future.

"I've had a couple feelers from people," Thurman said of possible offers from pro clubs that haven't materialized. "I'm just kind of waiting for the perfect storm. For me, I took off the last month and now I've got the itch to try and get going for the stretch run."

In an effort to be best prepared to take advantage of any possible opportunities, Thurman is mulling a potential stint in the local amateur leagues to sharpen his skills.

Joining the Wolves?: Thurman cited his father-in-law's fondness of the local leagues as the impetus for his potential connection with Mount Wolf of the Central League. Thurman said he was told the team was the "Yankees of the Central League" and eventually, after a chain of communication began, Wolves manager Tim Brenner reached out to offer a spot on the team.

Thurman's name is currently listed on the team's roster on the league's website, but Thurman has yet to throw a pitch for the Wolves. League guidelines are such that Thurman's name is there in order to make sure he is eligible to participate, if and when he decides to take the mound for Mount Wolf.

The all-time Revs' leader in wins (66), career starts (180), innings pitched (980 1/3) and strikeouts (667) said he has also been in contact with York Township, citing his close ties to player Tyler Page and former Revs' base coach Jeff Barkdoll.

However, Thurman remains unsure when — or if — he will take the bump on the local sandlots as he still awaits a potential professional offer. But he wanted to have options to be able to play this summer.

Turning to the rival?: Ideally, Thurman would like to be a hired gun down the late-summer playoff stretch for a professional club. One team Thurman expressed interest in playing for might produce a tough sight to see for Revolution fans.

"To be honest, the best-case scenario for me would be to play in Lancaster," Thurman said.

He cited his proximity to the team currently atop the Freedom Division's second-half standings as the main selling point, allowing him to remain active in the York community.

"For me right now, I want to put myself in the best situation because I live (in York). I can live here and work with the kids I've done lessons with here and be a part of their lives and see them play baseball games and be around my family a lot," Thurman said. "It's so close I could commute and still do all of those same things."

Thurman's 66 Atlantic League victories are second all-time to Tim Cain's 74.

And while he's sure to emphasize that he harbors no hard feelings toward the Revs, he did display the same competitive drive that made him a mainstay in York for so many years.

"Trust me, that would be the one thing I want to do," he said of the possibility of facing his old club.

"It's just like anything else, if I can go play for your rival and give it back to you, then I will do that," Thurman said. "That's that inside competitor saying 'I want to prove you wrong.'

"For me to put on another uniform would be vindication, in that someone else thought that I could still do this too."

And while he said he's had no contact with the team since his release, Thurman would certainly be willing to talk should the Revs find themselves in need.

"Playing for the organization has provided me my wife, my daughter and a great life in the community of York," he said. "If they want to talk to me, they know where I'm at, they can give me a call."

Other options: While playing baseball isn't in the immediate plans for Thurman, he did express pleasure that he has numerous other options, should he not get back on the bump.

He said possibilities include coaching, at a pro or travel level, working in a front office or even possibly finishing his degree in sports management and heading into the business world.

Thurman, saying nothing was out of the question, even mentioned a foray back into the acting world.

In 2010, Thurman, naturally, played the part of a professional baseball player in the movie "How Do You Know" starring Reese Witherspoon and Paul Rudd. Thurman says he still receives residual checks for his performance.

"The other day I got a check for $8 from pay-per view TV, that's cool," Thurman said. He later jokingly added: "That's a Taco Bell $5 box right there, bacon club chalupas, we'll roll with it."

Right now, though, Thurman is just enjoying life and the increased time with his family.

He says it's his first summer since the age of 4 without having to play baseball. It's allowing him to do things such as family vacations.

"This is the first real summer I've had time to enjoy my daughter and wife. We had a cookout on the Fourth of July. We've been to Hersheypark just about every week. We have season passes, and I love roller coasters," he said.

While the remainder of Thurman's baseball journey remains unclear, he will no doubt tackle all that comes his way with the same gusto familiar to the Revs' faithful.

"It's exciting for me, because it's the second chapter of life," Thurman said. "When I do know and I finally make that decision, we're going to go full throttle."

— Reach Elijah Armold at earmold@yorkdispatch.com; @EADispatch on Twitter

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