CONTRIBUTORS

Nancy Pelosi and her ego play dangerous game in Taiwan

Joe Battenfeld
Boston Herald (TNS)
Speaker of the U.S. House Of Representatives Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), left, speaks after receiving the Order of Propitious Clouds with Special Grand Cordon, Taiwan’s highest civilian honour, from Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen, right, at the president's office on Aug. 3, 2022. in Taipei, Taiwan. Pelosi arrived in Taiwan on Tuesday as part of a tour of Asia aimed at reassuring allies in the region, as China made it clear that her visit to Taiwan would be seen in a negative light. (Handout/Getty Images/TNS)

Narcissist Nancy Pelosi and her hot pink pantsuit played a dangerous and reckless game in Taiwan.

Even if it’s part of a coordinated U.S.strategy to regain credibility on the world stage, the 82-year-old Pelosi and her ego should not be the one to lead U.S. foreign policy against China.

The House speaker may emerge unscathed after her trip this week but the poor people and government of Taiwan will be the ones paying for Pelosi’s gambit.

As Pelosi was touching down in Taiwan this week, China immediately fired back, announcing that it would be holding “targeted military operations” with live-fire drills set to run Thursday to Sunday near the Taiwanese border. The operation could even encroach on Taiwan’s waters for the first time.

More:US House Speaker Pelosi arrives in Taiwan, defying Beijing

More:Biden says US would intervene with military to defend Taiwan

More:Milley: Chinese military a danger

Beijing was sending a clear message that it’s easily capable of closing off Taiwan in a naval blockade.

And all because what? Pelosi wanted to assert her congressional power — one she’s likely to lose in a few months after the midterm elections.

The Biden administration weakly objected to Pelosi’s congressional delegation trip before she left but now it’s clear the Democratic White House is standing in solidarity with Pelosi — even though she’s set back U.S.-China relations.

China did fail to deter Pelosi coming with its threats of retaliation and war but the communist nation is likely to take it out on Taiwan now that Pelosi is gone.

The Biden administration must ask itself some questions now that it has tacitly endorsed Pelosi’s Taiwan venture.

Why do we want to provoke China now?

The U.S. is in a weak position with inflation and fears of a recession weakening the economy. Biden’s approval ratings as a result are at a historic low. China would be well aware of this reality.

Biden is desperately trying to regain some hint of popularity by announcing this week the U.S.’s elimination of the head of al Qaeda. Pelosi’s challenge of China could be part of an overall effort by the Biden administration to show strength.

But Pelosi left in her wake a major foreign policy crisis and a potential future standoff with China.

Pelosi – never one to resist the spotlight — was hardly understated in her time in Taiwan, flaunting her visit with high-profile meetings with top Taiwanese officials and vowing to support the island that China has always claimed as part of its empire.

“America’s determination to preserve democracy here in Taiwan and around the world remains ironclad,” the speaker said.

Good luck, Taiwan.