Cancelling Congressman Scott Perry’s town hall meeting one day before the event “out of safety concerns” is hypocrisy. Cancellation came three days after the shooting at practice for the Congressional Baseball Game played the next day. Americans stood against hate and violence with higher-than-usual attendance and contributions.

Perry announced, "based on recent events and the security posture that we have, we had to make the determination," while thoughtful determination has only appeased NRA lobbyists, ignoring 74 percent of NRA members supporting background checks and waiting periods, according to Politifact.

Silver Spring’s police chief said, "When it happens three days before an event … you can't ignore it."

He’s right. Shootings cannot be ignored, except Sandy Hook Elementary, Aurora movie complex, Pulse nightclub, and countless tragedies demanding legislation of gun violence.

In America, 2017 has recorded to date 157 mass shootings, 28,261 gun incidents, 6,984 gun deaths (305 under age 11 and 1,466 ages 12-17), 13,723 injuries and 935 unintentional shootings (Gun Violence Archive, verified June 17, 2017).

While 137 U.S. police officers were shot or killed in the first half of 2017, Congress protects public access to military-grade weapons that overpower most police forces, while limiting police access to computerized gun data, forcing paperwork, adding weeks to investigations.

Congress will fix this when the lives of constituents and police officers become more valuable than NRA millions. While it doesn’t seem bloody likely, federal officials could start by getting Trump campaign officials to pay the outstanding security bill from last year’s rally at Cumberland Valley High School.

Deana Weaver

Carroll Township

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