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WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Election Day 2016 (all times EST):

8 p.m.

Democrat Hillary Clinton has won Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, Delaware and the District of Columbia while Republican Donald Trump has captured Oklahoma.

Clinton was awarded Massachusetts’ 11 electoral votes, 10 from Maryland, 14 from New Jersey and three each from Delaware and the nation’s capital, giving her 44 for the night. Trump picked up seven from Oklahoma, giving him 31.

The results Tuesday were not surprising. Massachusetts and the District of Columbia are two of the nation’s safest Democratic strongholds.

The last time Oklahoma went for a Democrat was 1964, when it voted for Lyndon Johnson. Maryland last went for the GOP in 1988.

New Jersey has been a safe Democratic state for 20 years. Its governor, Chris Christie, is a close Trump ally but is saddled with low approval numbers.

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7:45 p.m.

A state official says Democrats have gone to court to extend voting across Colorado by two hours after the secretary of state’s voter registration system went down for nearly 30 minutes Tuesday.

Lynn Bartels, a spokeswoman for the secretary of state’s office, says the hearing was scheduled for federal court in Denver.

She says state officials are investigating what caused the outage, which forced in-person voters to cast provisional ballots. Some county clerks were unable to process mail ballots that needed to have the signature verified.

Tauna Lockhart, spokeswoman for the state information technology office, says the system came back up about 3:20 p.m. She says the incident is under investigation by state officials, but there is no evidence the network was hit by hackers.

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7:35 p.m.

The North Carolina Board of Elections has agreed to extend voting in eight precincts in Durham County, where Democrats have a 4-to-1 registration advantage over Republicans.

The state board voted 3-2 Tuesday night to extend voting by an hour in two precincts most affected by a computer glitch. The problem forced poll workers to check for registered voters on paper printouts, causing long lines at some locations.

The board says six more precincts can stay open for a shorter time.

The NAACP’s North Carolina chapter had asked for the eight precincts to stay open for 90 extra minutes. Hillary Clinton’s campaign also supported keeping the polls open later in Durham.

Two groups filed lawsuits seeking to keep the polls open, but a state superior court judge declined to intervene.

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7:32 p.m.

North Carolina got more attention than usual this election, and exit polls show why.

Exit polls conducted by Edison Research for national media outlets suggest a tight finish between Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump for the state’s 15 electoral votes.

The polls suggest a majority of men back Trump, while Clinton won a majority among women — with the margins essentially even. The polls suggest women made up slightly more of the electorate.

About four out of five nonwhite voters backed Clinton, while about six out of 10 white voters supported Trump. But the exit polls don’t offer definitive information about actual turnout among those groups, with the estimates again pointing to a close finish.

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7:30 p.m.

Republican Donald Trump has won West Virginia and its five electoral votes.

The Mountain State was one of the billionaire’s biggest supporters in the Republican primary. He is popular for promising to bring back coal jobs. Hillary Clinton had largely been largely shunned for making comments perceived as an affront to the industry.

The dynamic has resulted in one of the few states where Republicans didn’t shy from the brash businessman and instead looked to ride his coattails. Many Democrats for congressional and other races scrambled to distance themselves from Clinton and refused to endorse her.

West Virginia has voted for Republican presidential candidates in each of the last four presidential races.

It takes 270 electoral votes to win the presidency.

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7:15 p.m.

Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams says he has found no evidence of fraud or intimidation at the city’s polls despite Republican candidate Donald Trump’s warnings about voter fraud.

Williams says no major problems have emerged among the 68 complaints his office investigated during the first half of Election Day.

Meantime, several Pennsylvania counties are reporting a handful of complaints about touchscreen machines switching votes. They say the machines are quickly being re-calibrated to fix the problem.

Pennsylvania Secretary of State Pedro Cortes says the GOP reported problems with about 25 machines, out of nearly 24,000 deployed statewide. He says in all cases votes ended up being recorded correctly.

State GOP Chairman Rob Gleason says he doesn’t see anything “nefarious” in the apparent vote switching on older machines.

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7:10 p.m.

Vast divides of race, gender and education are keeping the presidential race in two tightly fought southern states close shortly after polls close.

In both Virginia and Georgia, about 9 in 10 black voters and two-thirds of Hispanics backed Clinton, while most whites backed Trump.

That’s according to exit polls conducted by Edison Research for national media outlets.

In Georgia, large majorities of whites with and without college degrees backed Trump. In Virginia those two groups diverged. Whites without a college degree backed Trump by a large margin, while those with a degree split their votes between the two major-party candidates.

Women in both states were far more likely than men to back Clinton. Majorities of women in both states said Trump’s treatment of women bothers them a lot.

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7 p.m.

Republican Donald Trump has won Kentucky and Indiana while Democrat Hillary Clinton has won Vermont.

Trump was awarded Kentucky’s eight electoral votes and Indiana’s 11. Vermont gives Clinton three. These are the first states to be decided Tuesday in the 2016 general election.

The wins were expected.

Vermont has voted for a Democrat every election since 1988, while Kentucky has gone Republican every cycle since 2000.

Indiana is normally a Republican stronghold but went for President Barack Obama in 2008. The Republicans captured it again in 2012 and Trump’s running mate, Mike Pence, is the state’s governor.

The winning candidate needs 270 electoral votes.

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6:45 p.m.

Americans who have voted already in the presidential election appear to be evenly divided on the benefits of international trade.

According to an exit poll conducted by Edison Research for national media outlets, about four out of 10 voters believe trade among nations creates jobs. Another four out of 10 say it takes jobs from Americans.

Republican nominee Donald Trump has railed against decades of U.S. trade policy and has energized working-class voters with his promises to create more jobs at home. Democrat Hillary Clinton has historically supported U.S. trade deals, including as secretary of state.

But she has backed off her support for the Trans-Pacific Partnership. President Barack Obama’s trade agreement with Pacific Rim nations is still pending.

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6:40 p.m.

OK, so forget those ballot box selfies. Bring on the “I voted” stickers!

Stuck to noses, dogs and children, the stickers are front and center on social media, including many customized by cities and states. Others were served generic designs of stars and flags.

New York City went with the Statue of Liberty. In Tennessee, there were red stickers in the shape of the state. Some Georgia voters got an orange peach, and in parts of Virginia, a fancy eagle emblem was encircled in yellow.

One of the most impressive stickers may have belonged to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where stickers featured one of the famous Blue Dogs painted by New Iberia native George Rodrigue.

But alas, not everyone went home with a sticker. Some polls ran out, prompting some to express their sadness on social media as well.

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6:35 p.m.

A majority of Americans who have cast ballots already are at odds with Republican Donald Trump on two of his signature immigration proposals.

According to the preliminary results of exit polling conducted by Edison Research for The Associated Press and television networks, just four out of 10 voters say they support building a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. A majority oppose the idea.

About seven out of 10 people who have voted already say they’d rather allow workers in the U.S. illegally have a way to apply for legal status than have them deported. About a quarter of voters support deportation.

Trump fueled his rise to the Republican nomination with his promise to build a border wall and deport millions of residents in the U.S. illegally.

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6:25 p.m.

Hillary Clinton is thanking members of a Facebook group called “Pantsuit Nation.”

In a message Tuesday, Clinton said the group, which was named for her signature apparel, provides a special place for supporters to build a community. She said that “for some of you, it’s been difficult to feel like you could wear your support on your sleeve.”

Clinton also joked about the group’s moniker, saying “have you ever heard a better name?!”

The Democratic presidential nominee said she was hopeful she would win the presidential contest. If she does, she said she wants “to use those pantsuits for the best occasion of all — celebrating.”

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6:05 p.m.

Guests are beginning to gather at Donald Trump’s election night party in midtown Manhattan.

The GOP nominee is holding his event in the grand ballroom of a midtown Hilton hotel, where a stage has been decorated with dozens of American and state flags.

Trump’s campaign has also set up museum-style glass displays around the venue holding campaign merchandise, including his iconic “Make America Great Again” hats and pins.

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6 p.m.

More than half of Americans who went to the polls earlier Tuesday say Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton has the temperament to serve as president. About a third of voters say the same about Republican nominee Donald Trump.

But neither candidate can claim a mandate as the honest candidate according to the preliminary results of exit polling conducted by Edison Research for The Associated Press and television networks.

About six out of 10 voters say they don’t view Clinton as honest. About the same proportion say Trump isn’t honest. About three out of 10 voters say they believe neither candidate is honest.

As for what percentage of voters think both nominees are honest, that number is in single digits.

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5:55 p.m.

The Colorado Secretary of State’s voter registration system went down for nearly 30 minutes during midday voting Tuesday.

The failure forced in-person voters to cast provisional ballots, and some county clerks were unable to process mail ballots that needed to have the signature verified.

Tauna Lockhart, spokeswoman for the state information technology office, says the system came back up about 3:20 p.m. She says the incident is under investigation by state officials, but there is no evidence the network was hit by hackers.

She says the IT office has been monitoring its network for activity and said “there were no blips or anything.”

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5:40 p.m.

Police say they arrested two women after they took off their tops in protest at the Manhattan polling place used by Donald Trump.

The disruption occurred Tuesday morning at a grade school gym about two hours before Trump arrived.

The women began shouting and took off their tops to reveal anti-Trump slogans painted across their bare chests before police escorted then away.

They were released after being given summonses for electioneering, a violation of rules outlawing political activity at polls.

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5:37 p.m.

At least 2,000 people are already waiting inside the New York City convention center where Hillary Clinton is scheduled to hold her election night party.

Most people are sitting on the floor in an area the size of an airplane hangar. A handful of women are wearing pantsuits to honor Clinton.

Barnard College senior Madeline Walsh is wearing a black pantsuit. She says the garment means its wearer is more than just a woman.

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5:35 p.m.

A spokesman says former President George W. Bush did not vote for Republican Donald Trump or Democrat Hillary Clinton.

Freddy Ford says the most recent Republican president voted “none of the above for president and Republican down-ballot.” That means Bush voted for Republicans in congressional and local races.

It’s not a complete surprise. The Bush family includes the two most recent Republican presidents but neither endorsed nor campaigned for the billionaire businessman who captured the party’s nomination. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush was a one-time favorite to win the GOP presidential nomination until Trump got into the race and branded him with a name that stuck: “Low energy.”

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5:30 p.m.

Preliminary presidential exit polls results suggest that a clear majority of Americans going to the polls Tuesday have at least a moderate amount of confidence that votes will be counted accurately.

About half of those polled for The Associated Press and television networks told Edison Research they are very confident in the results. Another third said they are somewhat confident.

Fewer than one out of five say they’re not very confident or at all confident in the vote count.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has railed against the electoral system. He’s called it rigged and suggested without evidence there is widespread voter fraud that could affect the outcome.

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5:25 p.m.

Just more than half of voters going to the polls Tuesday approve of the job President Barack Obama is doing. But a majority is still upset with the way the federal government is working.

That’s according to preliminary results of the exit poll conducted for The Associated Press and television networks by Edison Research.

Just under half of those surveyed say they’re dissatisfied with the government’s performance. About a quarter say they’re angry.

About four out of 10 voters said the top quality they’re looking for in a candidate is change. That outranks good judgment, the right experience and caring about people like you as the preferred qualities in a president.

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