SUBSCRIBE NOW
$1 for 3 months. Save 97%.
SUBSCRIBE NOW
$1 for 3 months. Save 97%.

York City Fire chief: 40 residents evacuated after gas leak

Tina Locurto
York Dispatch
A crew working on Carlisle Road in York City struck a gas main forcing the evacuation of several homes in the 200 block, Wednesday, November 18, 2020
John A. Pavoncello photo

Forty York City residents were evacuated from their homes Wednesday morning due to a gas leak caused by nearby construction, according to York City Fire Chief Chad Deardorff.

Emergency crews first responded to the incident at 8:21 a.m. Wednesday in the 200 block of Carlisle Avenue.

Nearby roadwork on Carlisle Avenue caused the gas leak. The main gas line that was affected was located outside the homes, Deardorff said.

 "Columbia Gas arrived and shut the gas off," he said. "We ventilated the properties and (the residents) were able to get back in."

Rabbit Transit also arrived to help evacuate residents. All residents were back in their homes as of 11 a.m., Deardorff said.

Traffic on Carlisle Avenue between Madison and Linden avenues was stopped temporarily while Columbia Gas crews repaired the damaged facilities, said Russell Bedell, a spokesperson for Columbia Gas.

A crew working on Carlisle Road in York City struck a gas main forcing the evacuation of several homes in the 200 block, Wednesday, November 18, 2020
John A. Pavoncello photo

Crews finished fixing the leaking gas line before noon and Carlisle Avenue was reopened. No customers lost natural gas service during the incident, Bedell added.

"Columbia Gas identified the cause of the leak and was able to shut off the flow of gas and make the situation safe," Bedell said via email. "We did not detect natural gas readings in any structures and people were cleared to return to their homes by 11 a.m."

Regardless of the time of year, Bedell said gas leaks can occur and residents should be able to detect when a leak occurs.

He said the best way to detect a leak is by smelling the "distinctive" rotten egg odor that is added to natural gas. If a resident does smell natural gas, they should leave the area and call both 911 and Columbia Gas' emergency number at 888-460-4332.

— Reach Tina Locurto at tlocurto@yorkdispatch.com or on Twitter at @tina_locurto.