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Partnership brings Johns Hopkins surgeons to York

Alyssa Jackson
505-5438/@AlyssaJacksonYD
  • Johns Hopkins Children's Center and WellSpan York Hospital will partner to bring pediatric surgeons to the area.
  • Starting Sept. 1, pediatric surgeons will be available for consult at WellSpan York Hospital on a weekly basis.

Johns Hopkins Children's Center and WellSpan York Hospital are partnering to bring pediatric surgeons to the York area starting Sept. 1.

Located at 300 Pine Grove Commons, the new surgical practice will begin seeing patients for consultations on a weekly basis. The location was formerly occupied by Pine Grove Adult Medicine, which closed. Eight surgeons will begin the partnership by consulting and performing some surgeries at WellSpan York Hospital. In October, the surgeons will be available 24/7 for consultative services, according to a news release.

The goal is to make it so that guardians with sick children won't have to travel to get the care that is needed.

WellSpan York Hospital. (Bill Kalina - bkalina@yorkdispatch.com)

“WellSpan’s collaboration with the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center will bring a cadre of specialized pediatric surgeons to the York/Adams community, ensuring that many children in our communities who need pediatric surgical care will no longer need to be transported to hospitals outside our area,” said David Turkewitz, chairman and education coordinator of pediatrics and director of pediatric emergency medicine for WellSpan York Hospital, in a news release.

Minimally invasive and surgical treatments will be available for neonatal, infant, child and adolescent conditions in the York County area. WellSpan Health and Johns Hopkins Children's Center will offer continued care at Johns Hopkins Children's Center in Baltimore for children with rare conditions.

“We share a common goal with our colleagues at WellSpan, which is to provide the best pediatric surgical care in southcentral Pennsylvania,” said David Hackam, surgeon-in-chief for Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, in a news release.