LINKEDINCOMMENTMORE

Nylik Moore was spending a beautiful sunny day with friends when he was gunned down on East Maple Street, according to his mother.

"He was just standing there," Cheirha Rankins said. "He didn't have a chance. He got shot for nothing."

Moore, 18, of North York, was fatally shot in the back and leg just after 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 24, in the 100 block of East Maple Street, according to the York County Coroner's Office, which has ruled his death a homicide.

Wounded in that shooting was his friend, 20-year-old Jashan Wilson, of York City, who was shot in the arm, police said.

York City Police have released scant details about the shooting.

According to Rankins, Moore and two of his buddies were visiting another friend in the neighborhood and were walking to meet their ride home, when a car pulled up to them and stopped.

Someone inside the car said "What's up," then another passenger got out and started firing, according to Rankins.

That was 15 minutes after Moore and his buddies posted their location on Facebook, she said.

Shanquay Ritter, 21, is being sought for questioning in Moore's slaying, police said. Ritter and Moore knew each other, Rankins said.

"I thought (Ritter) was a friend to our family," she said, adding that her son never had any disagreements with him.

Rankins thinks her son was killed simply because a group of armed young men were driving around looking for someone to shoot.

Tried to run? She said she believes Moore tried to run away, as evidenced by the fact he was shot in the back.

More: York City mayor: 'I want answers' in York Hospital incident

Moore grew up in York City, on the south side and the west end of town, but didn't identify as a member of a gang or group, his mother told The York Dispatch.

"He was a sweetheart," she said, although admittedly not perfect.

"He had his ups and downs," Rankins said, but she noted the young man had recently shown a maturity that made her proud.

She said her son told her, "I see how hard it is out there now," and "I'm going to die here (in York) or go to jail here."

He had a pending criminal case, his family said, but he also had a plan.

"He was just trying to do the right thing," said Lamarr Sistrunk, Rankins' boyfriend. "He was looking forward to keeping a job, finishing his case and moving out of here."

More: Mom of slain teen arrested at York Hospital, not allowed to see son

More: Mayor, chief say help needed to solve York City shootings

Worked steadily: Since being freed on bail March 2, Moore went to work every day and kept his nose clean, his loved ones said. He wasn't a perfect person but had a good heart, loved his family and vowed to get away from the bad influences in York, they said.

"His friends were heading in a different direction," Rankins said. "I stayed on him so hard about gun violence, but it still cost him his life."

Defense attorney Tom Gregory said Moore's charges of carrying a firearm without a license, receiving stolen property and simple possession of a controlled substance stemmed from him being in a car with two friends.

The car crashed in York City, and the three young men fled, he said. Police later found two guns — one stolen — and some drugs in the car, he said.

Moore maintained the guns weren't his, and fingerprints found one of the guns belonged to someone other than Moore, Gregory said.

According to Rankins, her son was unwilling to snitch on the friend who had the guns.

"It's very tragic — he's an 18-year-old kid," Gregory said of Moore's death. "It's just sad."

Passion for music: Moore liked going to the gym and hanging out with his friends, and he played football until he was about 15 or 16, his family said.

But his passion was music, they said, and Moore would often sing to them, including a song he wrote.

"He was no Luther Vandross, but he tried," Rankins said.

Moore's grandmother, Kimberley Dickey, said he had a lovely voice.

"Music was his thing," said Sistrunk.

Sistrunk described Moore as a people person who was close with his family, especially with his mother.

"It was 'Mom, Mom' all day long," Rankins recalled.

Most recently, he would scold her for smoking cigarettes, telling her he and his siblings didn't want to lose her.

"He had the sweetest laugh," she said.

Anyone with information about Moore's homicide is asked to call York City Police at 717-846-1234, or text "Yorktips" and your information to 847-411. The texting service is anonymous, according to police.

Funds are being raised to help offset the costs of Moore's funeral services. Go to www.gofundme.com/send-nylik-home-properly for more information or to donate.

— Reach Liz Evans Scolforo at levans@yorkdispatch.com or on Twitter at @LizScolforoYD.

 

LINKEDINCOMMENTMORE
Read or Share this story: https://www.yorkdispatch.com/story/news/crime/2018/04/27/york-city-homicide-victim-shot-nothing-mother-says/557847002/