Guitars and fine art: New lawsuit over assets left at Think Loud building

Aimee Ambrose
York Dispatch

Members of the rock band Live, a business partner and their family of companies are involved in yet another lawsuit in York County.

This time, the new owner of their former headquarters in downtown York wants a judge to rule on who owns a considerable number of assets — including guitars and the painting used as the cover art for Live's 1994 album "Throwing Copper" — left inside the former Think Loud building.

Invictus One LLC, the company that now owns the structure at 210 York St., filed the civil suit Aug. 12. Included in it is a long list of items separated by what the company says it owns and what others own.

York County Economic Alliance and CampusDoor, a "financial technology company" formerly located in Carlisle, is now located at 210 York Street, inside the former Think Loud building, in York City, Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2022. Dawn J. Sagert photo

Among those assets, according to the lawsuit, Invictus claims possession of: recording studio and engineering equipment, computers, monitors, amps, speakers, cables, couches and chairs, several pieces of bedroom furniture from the third floor, an eagle statue and artist Peter Howson’s “Sisters of Mercy” painting.

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The lawsuit estimates the painting's value to be $100,000 based on previous bankruptcy filings. According to the auction house Christie's, the Scottish artist's painting was sold in 2005 for $186,000 against a price estimate between $80,000 and $120,000.

The painting used for the cover art of Live's 1994 album "Throwing Copper" is among the assets left behind at the Think Loud building, according to the lawsuit.

The suit notes that 120 York LLC, a company within the Think Loud umbrella, listed an estimated $230,000 in furniture, office equipment and studio equipment at the building in May 2021 as part of a bankruptcy petition.

Around the same time, Invictus said the defendants — Live members Chad Taylor, Patrick Dahlheimer and Chad Gracey, business partner William Hynes and several of their companies — abandoned the building and left their assets behind.

From left, Chad Taylor, on guitar,  Chad Gracey, on drums, lead singer Chris Shinn, and Patrick Dahlheimer, on bass, of the rock band Live, perform at the Wyndham Gardens Hotel during Starbucks’ anniversary celebration of 20 years at the York roasting plant in York, Pa. on Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015.  Dawn J. Sagert - dsagert@yorkdispatch.com

Listed as “owned by third party,” those items include music, recordings, reels, tapes, numerous guitars and instruments, music gear, records, memorabilia, awards, whiskey and wine bottles, a Marco Andretti helmet, a Kiss pinball machine and plaques of Live albums that went gold and platinum.

Attorneys for Invictus One and Hynes didn’t return messages seeking comment Wednesday.

Kinsley Construction Inc. refurbished the four-story structure, which formerly housed the Bi-Comp printing company, in 2013 to serve as the headquarters for the Think Loud companies, including United Fiber & Data, which launched to install fiber optic infrastructure for running high-speed internet. Recording studio space was also designed into the building.

United Fiber and Data CEO Bill Hynes (second from left) poses with Live band members (from left) Chad Taylor, Chad Gracey and Patrick Dahlheimer, who are founders of the company.

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The members of Live stepped down as managers a few years later. Hynes rose to CEO of UFD while also managing the other companies like 120 York.

Hynes, 50, was then charged in November 2019 with multiple criminal counts, including burglary, trespassing, theft, forgery and tampering with public records.

The case involved a former girlfriend who worked at UFD.

He’s scheduled to go to trial beginning Sept. 12 in that case.

Bill Hynes leaves the York County Judicial Center after a pretrial conference Monday, June 29, 2020. He faces charges that include stalking, burglary, forgery and tampering with public records. Bill Kalina photo

Meanwhile, Hynes resigned as CEO shortly after he was charged.

A war of civil suits started around October 2020. Louis Appell III, the son of one of UFD’s key backers, alleged corporate mismanagement, saying Hynes used the business as a “piggy bank.”

Hynes filed a suit of his own with allegations that Appell extorted stakeholders and deadlocked company board decisions.

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Kinsley also got involved in 2020. Civil action was taken against 120 York, demanding payment of the outstanding balance and interest from a construction loan dating back to 2013. The company won a nearly $14 million judgment out of that.

120 York went into bankruptcy in April 2021 and emerged that September after abandoning the building.

Kinsley then took possession of the Think Loud building, and then sold it and assets inside to Invictus a couple of months later for $6 million.

Think Loud Development in York City, Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020. Dawn J. Sagert photo

Hynes signed over assets, such as furniture and studio gear, as part of negotiations with Invictus, according to the latest lawsuit over the assets. That reportedly included a deal for Invictus to purchase the building from Kinsley and to clear 120 York, Hynes, Gracey, Dahlheimer and Taylor of the loan debt to Kinsley.

With the former Think Loud building in hand, Invictus began leasing space there to Campus Door to serve as its new headquarters. The Carlisle-based company serves as a third-party organization that processes loans for banks and credit unions.

— Reach Aimee Ambrose at aambrose@yorkdispatch.com or on Twitter at @aimee_TYD.