'We need to do something': Residents fed up with speeding on Meeting House Road

Lindsey O'Laughlin
York Dispatch

A group of residents on the border of East Manchester Township and Manchester borough is petitioning the township and the police department to add a stop sign in an area where they say the speeding is out of control.

Meeting House Road runs about a quarter mile, connecting North George Street Extended in East Manchester Township to the intersection of High Street and Board Road in Manchester borough, near Northeastern Middle School.

"This is a through street, and a direct route for all the school buses," said Rene Shuman, who lives in the 100 block of Meeting House Road.

Rene Shuman stands along Meeting House Road In East Manchester Township, where he lives, Wednesday, March 17, 2021. He presented at the police board meeting Monday a petition from several residents to add a stop sign or speed monitor to an intersection along the road. Bill Kalina photo

The speed limit on the road is 25 mph, but Shuman said most people drive about 40 mph, and there are some vehicles that go even faster.

Shuman brought a petition to the Northeastern Regional Police Board meeting Monday with the signatures of 21 people who live on or near Meeting House Road. The petition is to have a stop sign placed at the intersection of Meeting House Road and Covington Drive to slow traffic.

If a stop sign isn't feasible, the petitioners asked to have speed tables placed on Meeting House Road, one on either side of the intersection with Covington Drive.

Speed tables are raised portions of a road, generally longer than speed bumps, that help to slow the flow of traffic.

Traffic moves along Meeting House Road in East Manchester Township Wednesday, March 17, 2021. Rene Shuman, who lives on the road, presented at the police board meeting Monday a petition from several residents to add a stop sign or speed monitor to an intersection along the road. Bill Kalina photo

Chief Bryan Rizzo said that now that the weather is warming up and there's no snow on the ground, the police department can set out a speed trailer to collect data about how fast people are driving and the worst time of day for speeding, to plan for the best time to station a police officer there.

"It’s tough to sit an officer out there for hours and hours and wait," Rizzo said. "We want to make sure we put them out there when it’s actually occurring so we can catch the people who are actually doing it."

Shuman said there's a lot of concern among the residents who live there, and that it's not safe for people who are walking along the road, including kids who are walking to school.

Board member Robert Nace said the township should conduct a traffic study on the road to determine the best way to address the problem.

"We need to do something," Nace said.

More:Red Lion man: Local parking rules a 'bureaucratic exercise'

More:Northeastern Regional Police moves toward dissolution, preps for merger