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Painful questions after siege of Capitol

Lisa Mascaro and Matthew Daly
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The violent siege of the Capitol by President Donald Trump’s supporters forced painful new questions across government on Thursday — about his fitness to remain in office for two more weeks, the ability of the police to secure the complex and the future of the Republican Party in a post-Trump era.

In the immediate aftermath, the attack on the world’s iconic dome of democracy reinforced lawmakers’ resolve to finish counting the Electoral College vote confirming that Democrat Joe Biden won the presidential election.

They pushed through the night, and shortly before 4 a.m. Thursday finished their work, confirming Biden had won the election.

Vice President Mike Pence, presiding over the joint session, announced the tally, 306-232.

But the rampage that shocked the world and left the country on edge prompted lawmakers to launch a congressional review of the U.S. Capitol Police’s failure to stop the the breach and is forcing a broader reckoning over Trump’s tenure in office and what comes next for a torn nation.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said that any remaining day with the president in power could be “a horror show for America.” Likewise, Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said the attack on the Capitol was “an insurrection against the United States, incited by the president,” and Trump must not stay in office “one day” longer.

Invoking the 25th amendment: Pelosi and Schumer called for invoking the 25th Amendment to the Constitution to force Trump from office before Biden is inaugurated on Jan. 20. In fact, Schumer said he and Pelosi tried to call Pence early Thursday to discuss that option but were unable to connect with the vice president.

At least one Republican lawmaker joined them. The procedure allows for the vice president and a majority of the Cabinet to declare the president unfit for office. The vice president then becomes acting president.

Pelosi said if the president’s Cabinet does not swiftly act, the House may proceed to impeach Trump.

Meanwhile, other Republicans who echoed Trump’s false claims of a fraudulent election, including rising stars and some party leaders, faced angry, unsettled peers –- but also those cheering them on.

Trump silent: With tensions high, the Capitol shuttered and lawmakers not scheduled to return until the inauguration, an uneasy feeling of stalemate settled over a main seat of national power as Trump remained holed up at the White House.

The social media giant Facebook banned the president from its platform and Instagram for the duration of Trump’s final days in office, if not indefinitely, citing his intent to stoke unrest. Twitter had silenced him the day before.

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg said “the shocking events of the last 24 hours” make it clear Trump “intends to use his remaining time in office to undermine the peaceful and lawful transition of power.”

Trump, who had repeatedly refused to concede the election, said in a statement immediately after the early-morning vote on Capitol Hill that there will be an “orderly transition” on Inauguration Day.

‘The president caused this’: Several lawmakers suggested that Trump be prosecuted for a crime, impeached for a second time or even removed under the Constitution’s 25th Amendment, which seemed unlikely two weeks from when his term expires. The House impeached Trump in 2019, and the Senate acquitted him in 2020.

While Democrats led the charge to invoke the 25th Amendment, similar conversations among Republicans within the administration had made their way to Capitol Hill.

Republican Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, publicly called on Trump’s Cabinet to invoke the 25th Amendment and remove the president from office.

“The president caused this,” Kinzinger said in a video posted to Twitter. “The president is unwell.”

The Republicans who led the effort to challenge the Electoral College tally for Biden exposed the extent of the divisions within the party, and the nation, after four years of Trump’s presidency.

Those two GOP senators, Ted Cruz of Texas and Josh Hawley of Missouri, faced angry peers in the Senate.

Cruz in a statement defended his objection to the election results as “the right thing to do” as he tried unsuccessfully to have Congress launch an investigation.

In the House, Republican leaders Rep. Kevin McCarthy of California and Rep. Steve Scalise of Louisiana, joined in the effort to overturn Biden’s win by objecting to the Electoral College results.

Despite Trump’s repeated claims of voter fraud, election officials and his own former attorney general have said there were no problems on a scale that would change the outcome. All the states have certified their results as fair and accurate, by Republican and Democratic officials alike.