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Turning Point opens services for boys, men

Christopher Dornblaser
505-5436/@YDDornblaser
  • Turning Point is now opening services to boys and men.
  • A grant allowed the expansion.

For four years now, Turning Point, a York County-based organization that provides therapy to childhood sex abuse victims, was only offering services to women and girls.

On Wednesday, the organization kicked off its new expansion, which will allow boys and men to come to them for help. The expansion is a result of a $230,000 grant from the Victims of Crime Act.

Deb Stock, executive director for the organization, said that without the help of the grant, the expansion would not have been possible.

Matt Sandusky talks with staff at Turning Point on Wednesday , Feb. 22. Sandusky was there to announce that the Springettsbury Township victims organization was now offering their services to men and boys. John A. Pavoncello photo

Male abuse: Matthew Sandusky, an adopted son of Jerry Sandusky and a victim of abuse, serves as an member of the advisory board. On Tuesday, Sandusky drove two hours from State College for the event.

Sandusky, who is a founder of Peaceful Hearts, an organization that raises awareness for childhood sexual abuse, said he didn't mind the drive if it meant he could spread more awareness of the issue.

"For me, it's a no-brainer to come here." he said.

He said there's a stigma for some males to report their abuse and that Turning Point was helping to fight that stigma.

"Now, by making a concerted effort to bring males to the forefront as well ... it's huge," he said.

Sandusky said what Turning Point is doing is showing victims there is a way to get past the abuse.

"I do this because I believe in the power of healing," he said.

Grant: With the grant, the organization was able to make renovations to its building at 2100 E. Market St. in Springettsbury Township.

Kristen Woolley, founder and clinical director, said the money was used to make one room a space that would be more comfortable for men.

Woolley said the organization had always intended to make its services available for men, women and children, and the grant made it possible.

"Sadly, it's something that's very badly needed," Stock said of the expansion.

For more information on Turning Point, check its website, turningpointyork.org/.

— Reach Christopher Dornblaser at cdornblaser@yorkdispatch.com or on Twitter at @YDDornblaser.