Former Penn State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, left, arrives for sentencing Tuesday at the Centre County Courthouse in Bellefonte,
Former Penn State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, left, arrives for sentencing Tuesday at the Centre County Courthouse in Bellefonte, Pa. (Gene Puskar/AP Photo)

Jerry Sandusky's 30- to 60-year prison sentence isn't enough, several area residents and Penn State students said Tuesday shortly after his sentencing.

A judge handed down what amounts to a life sentence to Sandusky, 68, Tuesday morning. Found guilty on 45 counts of child sexual abuse involving 10 boys, Sandusky must serve a minimum of 30 years.

Sandusky has insisted he's innocent and, in a three-minute monologue on Penn State Com Radio, said he's the victim of a coordinated conspiracy.

Sandusky could have faced up to 400 years in prison, and local residents think he deserved the maximum.

"I'm surprised it's not a heck of a lot more," said York resident Carolyn Kraft.

Kraft was similarly surprised Sandusky maintains his innocence.

"I don't know how he's not realizing it," she said.

York City's C.J. Millburn, 22, took it a step further.

"I think he should die," for his crimes, Millburn said.

Students respond: Several Penn State York students said they were concerned how Sandusky's actions have affected Penn State's image. His sentencing, said sophomore Carley Spangler, could help the university move on.

As for the sentence terms, "I found that to be a little on the low side," said Spangler, a third-generation Penn State student.

Alannah Lentz, a senior, worried over the summer that the Freeh report, conducted by former FBI director Louis Freeh to analyze the handling of the child abuse incidents and its aftermath, would distract people from the good things Penn State students are doing, such as THON fundraising for childhood cancer research.

Even after the sentencing, Lentz is worried the scandal still "will put a cloud over Penn State."

Senior Shanna-Kay Samuels and freshman Christian Boakye were satisfied with the 30-plus years in prison, if only for realistic expectations.

"I'm pretty sure he's not going to live" beyond that, Samuels said.

"Nobody is going to live to 100, especially in jail," Boakye added.