A Sept. 2, 2014, blaze at Adio Chiropractic, 32 S. Main St. in Stewartstown, was ruled arson by a state police fire marshal. Dr. David Wistort is believed
A Sept. 2, 2014, blaze at Adio Chiropractic, 32 S. Main St. in Stewartstown, was ruled arson by a state police fire marshal. Dr. David Wistort is believed to have started the fire before committing suicide in a nearby park, police said. (Photo courtesy of Eureka Volunteer Fire Co.)

A Stewartstown chiropractor whose office was damaged by an arson fire on Tuesday morning was found dead Tuesday afternoon in a nearby borough park, according to police, who suspect he set the fire.

Dr. David Wistort, 54, of White Hall, Md., died of a gunshot wound to the chest, according to York County Coroner Pam Gay, who has ruled his death a suicide.

"Based on what we saw and determined ... all indicators are that it's suicide, so no autopsy was performed," Gay said.

Officers from Southern Regional Police found Wistort's body at 2:40 p.m. Tuesday at the Stewartstown Community Fairgrounds, Southern Regional Detective Bill Shafer confirmed.

The park is about a half-mile from the doctor's former practice, Adio Chiropractic, at 32 S. Main St.

An arson fire significantly damaged Adio Chiropractic at 32 S. Main St. in Stewartstown on Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014. (Photo courtesy of Eureka Volunteer Fire
An arson fire significantly damaged Adio Chiropractic at 32 S. Main St. in Stewartstown on Tuesday, Sept. 2, 2014. (Photo courtesy of Eureka Volunteer Fire Co.)

Doctor missing: Officials began looking for Wistort to alert him that his office was damaged by fire, but he could not be located, according to Eureka Fire Chief Ira Walker Jr.

Police then began searching as well.

"We received information his car was parked in the parking lot (of the fairgrounds)," Shafer said, so officers searched the park and they found Wistort's body.

Shafer said the investigation determined Wistort's chiropractic license expired Aug. 31, and that the doctor had left personal documents in a way that indicated he was planning his death.

Investigators believe they know why Wistort took his own life, but details about that are not being made public, Shafer said.


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"There was no (suicide) note, but there were other indicators," he said. "It's a tragic situation."

The fire: Shafer said detectives believe Wistort was directly involved in the arson at his office, and that he acted alone.

The investigation is wrapping up, but detectives are still waiting for results from lab analyses in the arson case, according to the detective.

Firefighters reported smelling gasoline while battling Tuesday's 2:45 a.m. office blaze, and samples were sent to a state police crime lab to be analyzed for the presence of an accelerant, police said.

A few hours before the fire, Wistort was seen buying gasoline, police said.

No break-in: The blaze started on the first floor and the building had not been broken into, according to Fire Chief Walker.

No one was hurt, he said.

There was significant damage to the structure, "and mostly a lot of heat and smoke damage throughout" the building, he said. Medical equipment also was damaged, he said.

Walker said the building is salvageable.

— Reach Liz Evans Scolforo at levans@yorkdispatch.com.