I am writing you to discuss the June 27 article "FDA pushes tougher sunscreen labeling regulations" by Mollie Durkin. This article particularly caught my interest because my cousin died of melanoma at age 26 last summer.

I agree with a quote in the article saying that a suntan is a form of stupidity. You were made with the certain skin tone that God intended for you. There is no reason for tanning; it is definitely done in vain.

A patron at the pool even said it would probably kill her in the end. I do not see how anyone could think it was worth it to have a tan if it mean they would die. Many people are not familiar with the effects of cancer. I have seen my cousin and many other people suffer.

Sometimes I would like to have a nice glow, but instead I wear copious amounts of sunblock.

It's inevitable that I am going to get some sort of a base tan if I expose myself to sun, so I try to limit this. I only sit out of the water for intervals of 10 to 15 minutes (or long enough to let the sunblock sink in) then I get back in the water. During the summer, often times I will work outside for extra cash (landscaping, mowing or exterior painting) when I don't have class. I try to put sunblock on areas like my cheeks, forehead, nose and shoulders where the sun is hitting them the most.

Not only do I not want to die from skin cancer, but I would like to preserve the integrity of my skin. I like smooth, unwrinkled skin on my face; I wouldn't want it to be tight and leathery.

I feel as though the outward pressure on today's youth distorts their logic when it comes to tanning. If you really need that extra glow, I would recommend Jergen's Natural Glow lotion. It will safely, gradually tan your skin. I can understand people enjoy to be outside in the summer and don't want to look ghastly from having no sunlight. It is still possible to protect yourself in the sun and have a healthy glow to your skin (this does not mean a tan ).

I am happy to know the FDA is pushing for a more accurate sun screen label.

GinaMarie Scognamiglio

Hummelstown