All we hear is the bad side.

That's the nature of things. We'll never hear much about the preacher who works day and night to feed the hungry and clothe the poor. And we'll likely never read the name of the teacher who shaped young minds of and inspired countless students.

But we can all name folks who have crossed the line -- who have done such evil that they taint the good works of all their colleagues.

It's the same story with guns. Yes, every firearm ever built has the potential to carry out evil intentions. Sadly, we're reminded of it all the time. But what about the good? We rarely hear about how our lawful neighbors use their firearms -- or the good that gets done. We never hear about the countless guns that do no harm. I'd like to change that.

16-year-old Cheyenne Jones of Felton is shown while competing in New Freedom’s Seitzland Rifle Clubs 22nd annual New Year’s Day event. Jones
16-year-old Cheyenne Jones of Felton is shown while competing in New Freedom's Seitzland Rifle Clubs 22nd annual New Year's Day event. Jones won the junior competition while shooting her pink-colored AR-15 rifle. Twenty-eight shooters from Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania participated in the event. (Submitted photo)

Just over a week ago, 28 shooters from Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania met on the grounds of New Freedom's Seitzland Rifle Club. It was the group's 22nd annual New Year's Day competition.

The goal was simple -- see who was the best offhand shooter. There were no gun rests, no mats to lie on, or chairs to shoot from. The competitors simply stood and shot. And with 50 rounds to put in the target that sat 200 yards down range, they had better be consistent if they wanted a prize.

Here's the jaw-dropping part. Nobody got hurt. In fact, some of those semi-automatic rifles that we're all so frightened of even showed up at the event.

In the end, it was a bolt-action Remington fired by Nate Guernsey of Centerville, Va., who won the top prize. But a duo of AR-15s rounded out the top three.

Even more noteworthy, 16-year-old Cheyenne Jones of Felton won the junior competition while shooting her pink-colored AR-15. When was the last time you heard of a student with a gun in a positive connotation? Sadly, I bet it's been awhile.

But these shooters did not get together to send some sort of pro-gun message. I'm the one injecting that idea. They gathered on a cold winter morning to compete. They wanted to see who has the most talent and the most skill. But I'm the one saying there are countless others just like them spread throughout the state and the nation.

Just like guns, every human on this planet has the ability to do great harm. We are pounded by the idea every day. I argue, though, that all of us have an even stronger ability to do great good. But it's in our nature to ignore it.

We'd rather focus on the negative than shine a light on the positive.

All we hear is the bad side.

-- Andy Snyder writes about the outdoors for The York Dispatch. He can be reached at sports@york dispatch.com.