11:30 a.m. update: A winter weather advisory is in effect for York County from 11 p.m. Friday until 4 p.m. Saturday, the National Weather Service announced.

Snow will begin in the region around midnight and continue through Saturday afternoon, leaving 2-4 inches of snow, the NWS said. North winds at 5-15 mph with gusts up to 25 mph will create some blowing and drifting of snow, the service said.

Previous story: The foot of snow predicted for York County Thursday was actually closer to two feet in most places, and Dover takes Thursday's "highest snowfall" award with 20 inches.

Heavy bands of snow, some no wider than a town, passed over some areas and produced a wide range of snowfall totals for the county, said Tom Kines, a senior meteorologist with AccuWeather.

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While York City lucked out with 9.5 inches, the suburbs got buried. Loganville recorded 19.5 inches. In Shrewsbury, 19; New Freedom, 16; Hanover, 14; Red Lion got 13 inches.

There's more on the way, but Kines said it's nothing compared to Thursday's nor'easter.

The 1-3 inches, forecast to fall around 10 p.m. Friday, should grow the shoveling toss-pile just a bit higher.

"If you made it through yesterday, you got nothing to worry about," Kines said.

And if you make it through Friday night, you just need to make it through the flurries on Sunday and the Monday night mix of snow and ice and rain.

Then, the skies finally dry on Tuesday. The sun will come out and temperatures could reach 50 degrees at least two days next week, he said.

Cleaning up: A contingent of the state's National Guard was standing ready in York County to aid first responders in traveling to those who call for help.

The six Guard members, based out of Hanover, will use a Humvee and an ambulance version of four-wheel drive military vehicle to get to first responders to patients anywhere in the county, said Carl Lindquist, spokesman for York County.

"Their mission is to support first responders," he said.

As of Friday morning, they had not been deployed, Lindquist said.

The six members of the Guard are part of 800 National Guard troops deployed to local armories as a precaution against emergencies resulting from the storm.

PennDOT: Crews have been working 12-hour shifts since snow started falling Wednesday night, said Mike Martin, the York County maintenance manager for PennDOT. On top of the typical complement of 74 plow trucks PennDOT used to clear roads in the county, two additional rented ones were called in Thursday, he said.

Aided by above-freezing temperatures and rain, crews were able to have roads cleared by Thursday evening before snow started again about 6 p.m. Then, new snowfall posed new problems.

With nowhere to go with the added snow, the crews were to blow the snow forward and then blow it to the side of the highway.

Friday: Friday morning's commute was slippery, and Lindquist said the county's 911 call center noted an increase in disabled vehicles during rush hour.

About 7 a.m., a black Rabbit Express bus was stuck in a snow bank at the I-83 and Mount Rose Avenue interchange. A red sports car was stuck on the entrance ramp at Market Street, with a man shoveling in front of the vehicle as cars approached from behind. And there were similar scenes from across the county.