Update, 11 p.m.: The snow has ended in York. Primary concerns now are wind (for both drifting and chill) and cold.

Temperatures are expected to reach close to zero, with wind gusting to 40 mph.

Update, 9:30 p.m.: The snowfall in York County is expected to end in less than an hour, according to AccuWeather.com.

The winter storm warning remains in effect until 10 p.m., when the snow is expected to end, said Frank Strait, senior meteorologist with AccuWeather.

So far, York County has received 6 to 10 inches of snow, he said.

Several local inch counts have been reported AccuWeather, including 10 inches of snow in Shrewsbury, more than 9 inches in Dover, at least 7 inches in Dallastown and Red Lion, and 6 inches or more in Hanover, Lewisberry, Leader Heights and East York, Strait said.

With the snow slowing down, wind and cold are now the primary concern for the area, he said.

"Wind gusts at 40 miles per hour, combined with the cold temperature, it will get close to zero (Tuesday) night," he said. "It will be dangerously cold, but the wind should lessen (Wednesday) morning."

However, the roads will remain hazardous tonight and the early part of Wednesday, as the wind will cause snow to blow on the roads.

The National Weather Service has issued a wind chill advisory for York from midnight until noon Wednesday, because of the expected minus-15-degree wind-chill temperatures early Wednesday morning.

Update, 7 p.m.: There are still a few hours of snow to go for York County, according to the National Weather Service.

"But it's tapering off some," said John LaCorte, a NWS meteorologist. "(The snow has) started trimming off to the west. But we still have a band (of snowfall) that has a way to go yet."

Snow will continue to fall into late evening until the winter storm warning ends at 10 p.m., he said.

The service has issued a wind chill advisory for York from midnight until noon Wednesday, because of the expected minus-15-degree wind-chill temperatures early tomorrow morning.

Inch counts for snow have not changed since the morning, with the central York County area expected to receive 8-10 inches of snow. Lower accumulations are expected in northern York County and slightly higher amounts of snow are expected in the southeastern portion of the county.

The northern part of the county is still expected to get 6-8 inches, while the southern part could get 8-10 and the extreme southeast corner could be covered with 10-14 inches of snow, according to LaCorte.

Update 1:20 p.m.:The National Weather Service said snowfall will continue through the day, with heavier bands of snowfall occurring through the afternoon and early evening.

Snow will continue to fall into late evening until the winter storm warning ends at 10 p.m., said Elyse Colbert, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in State College.

The service has issued a wind chill advisory for York from midnight until 12 p.m. Wednesday, because of the expected minus 15 temperatures early tomorrow morning.

Inch counts have not changed since the morning, with the central York County area expected to receive 8-10 inches of snow. Lower accumulations are expected in northern York County and slightly higher amounts of snow are expected in the southeastern portion of the county.

For all the celebration of its growing tourism industry, there's at least one repeat visitor Yorkers might wish they could send back from whence it came: the arctic air that's again bringing single-digit lows and biting wind chills.

And this time, it comes with about a foot of snow, depending where in York County one lives.

The northern part of the county is expected to get 6-8 inches, the southern part could get 8-10 and the extreme southeast corner could be covered with 10-14 inches of snow from the storm that started rolling in during the morning commute Tuesday, said Colbert.

Several municipalities, including York City, declared snow emergencies Tuesday, and all of the county's public schools closed in anticipation of the storm.

Colbert said it's probably going to be Thursday before schools open again, as the wind chill Wednesday morning about the time children would be standing at their bus stops is expected to be around minus 15. 

The snow is expected to stick around for at least a few days because it will be too cold to melt, she said.

Falling temperatures: After starting Tuesday in the mid-20s, temperatures are expected to drop as snow falls throughout the day, falling to 4 degrees for the overnight low, Colbert said.

Snow was expected to taper off before midnight, but there's a chance of more snow in the forecast every day through Sunday except Friday. Wednesday is forecast to be sunny, with a high near 13 and wind chills as low as minus 14. There's a chance of snow after 9 p.m., with an overnight low of 3 degrees.

There's a chance of snow showers before 1 p.m. Thursday, with a high near 20 and a low around 5.

Friday will be sunny with a high near 17 and a low around 11. There's a chance of snow showers Saturday, with a high near 31 and low around 14. Sunday could bring more snow showers, with a high near 27 and low around 15.

Colbert said it's too early to tell how much accumulation there will be over the weekend, but it's not expected to be as much as Tuesday's storm.

She said Yorkers will want to bundle up, because it's easy to get frostbite and hypothermia in the forecast temperatures.

People shouldn't go outside if they don't have to, and they shouldn't leave pets outside for very long, she said.

"They'll get as cold as you," she said. "They still can get frostbite and hyperthermia."

Particularly sensitive are their noses and the little pads on their feet, she said.

- Reach Christina Kauffman at ckauffman@yorkdispatch.com.