A field inspector with the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District, tests a sprayer that could be used in the future to spray pesticides to control
A field inspector with the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District, tests a sprayer that could be used in the future to spray pesticides to control mosquitos. (AP File Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

Mosquito bites are often considered an evening problem, but to the distress of York County residents, a species of the blood-suckers that feasts during the day has made itself at home in their backyards.

The Asian tiger mosquito population is very high in the area, said Lisa Kasianowitz, state Department of Environmental Protection spokeswoman.

Some Yorkers have complained that it's hard for people and pets alike to enjoy the outdoors because of the dense population, she said.

As a result, the department is taking steps to control the annoying pests, she said. They are considered a nuisance and, at this point, do not typically carry West Nile virus, she said.

Pilot program: The department was to spray areas throughout Hanover Wednesday and Thursday morning to control larval and adult mosquito populations, Kasianowitz said.

The sprays are part of a pilot program to control the day-biters, she said, and they are only happening in this region. If the program is successful at controlling the population, it will be implemented in other parts of the state, she said.

The department sprayed the Hanover area on July 12, 17 and 18, she said. Sprays provide temporary relief to neighborhoods, but mosquitoes breed quickly in standing water and soon return, Kasianowitz said, and residents should clean up.

"We can never reiterate it too much," she said. "Unfortunately, these mosquitoes can breed in very shallow water."

Kasianowitz recommends checking the outside of your house and removing any standing water, including bird baths, for a more permanent solution to the mosquito problem. But for now, Hanover will enjoy a reprieve from the pests, she said.

"I hope people can go out and enjoy these cooler evenings," she said.

Mosquito-fighting tips

Pennsylvania's Department of Environmental Protection offers these tips to help eliminate mosquito breeding areas:

--Dispose of cans, buckets, plastic containers, ceramic pots or similar containers that hold water.

--Properly dispose of discarded tires that can collect water.

--Drill holes in the bottom of outdoor recycling containers.

--Have clogged roof gutters cleaned every year, particularly if the leaves from surrounding trees have a tendency to plug drains.

--Turn over plastic wading pools when not in use.

--Turn over wheelbarrows and don't let water stagnate in birdbaths.

--Aerate ornamental pools or stock them with fish.

--Clean and chlorinate swimming pools not in use and remove any water that may collect on pool covers.

To report high mosquito populations in your area, visit www.westnile.state.pa.us.