Bracey
Bracey

York City Mayor Kim Bracey, Democrats' choice to serve a four-year term beginning in January, will face one challenger in November's election.

Libertarian David Moser has filed nomination papers to appear on the Nov. 5 ballot. The deadline was Thursday for minor-party and independent candidates to file a petition with at least 100 signatures.

Moser had announced his intention to run for mayor in March. He said Thursday that he submitted about 170 signatures.

The 35-year-old businessman said he knows he's an underdog in a race against an incumbent mayor, but, he said, he intends to campaign seriously over the next few months.

He said there are a few things working in his favor. Few people, Moser said, are satisfied with the city's status quo.

Moser
Moser

The nation's divisive political atmosphere is also making people "more willing to look at additional options," he said.

"It's a two-way race. I think that, again, counts in my favor," Moser said. "There's definitely a lot of aspects here that are going to throw me at least a few percentage points."

If elected, Moser said he would begin working to improve the city's business environment.

"The single biggest priority at this point, especially after spending the time that I have on the streets, I seriously think we need to streamline our permits and applications process to open businesses and maintain businesses within the city limits," he said.

Moser said he would also use his position as York's mayor to advocate for same-sex marriage rights in Pennsylvania.

"Frankly, we have a reputation of being somewhat backward. We have a reputation of being behind the times. I, for one, am tired of it," he said. "I definitely see an ability for York to take a lead position."

Bracey, who defeated York City Council President Carol Hill-Evans for the Democratic nomination in May, did not respond to a request for comment Thursday.

Moser, the chairman of the York County Libertarian Party, ran last year for the 95th state House District against then-incumbent Rep. Eugene DePasquale, a Democrat.

DePasquale won re-election, defeating Moser with nearly 83 percent of the vote. (DePasquale later resigned to take over as the state's auditor general, triggering the need for a special election. Rep. Kevin Schreiber, D-York City, now holds the seat.)

Moser also ran unsuccessfully in 2011 for a spot on the York City School Board.

- Erin James may also be reached at ejames@yorkdispatch.com.