Traveling from the west side of Route 30 to the east side is usually the worst part of Wanda Stehli's day.

"Anyone who drives on (Route) 30 during rush hour knows how annoying it is," she said.

Not only is it annoying, it's one of the most congested corridors in the Harrisburg-York-Lancaster area, according to TRIP, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank that supports transportation policies.

The nonprofit released a report ranking the 14 of the worst commuter routes in that area Thursday. Five York corridors made the list, plus I-83 from the Cumberland-York County line to I-81 in Harrisburg.

In determining the most congested commuter routes in the region, TRIP relied on information from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, said Frank Moretti, director of policy and research for TRIP, a group backed by highway construction companies, engineers, insurance firms, equipment manufacturers, labor unions and other industry organizations.

PennDOT provided travel time data for numerous routes throughout the state, and TRIP used the information to determine the region's most costly commutes.

Made the list: In addition to the Route 30 corridor, from the PA-74 (Carlisle Road) entrance ramp to North Hills Road, other heavily congested roads in York County include four corridors: Country Club Road/Rathton Road, Mount Rose Avenue, Cape Horn Road/Edgewood Road, Church Road/George Street/Emig Road.

Between about 44,000 and 62,000 commuters travel on the Route 30 corridor every day. The congestion causes an average rush-hour commuter to lose about 42 hours of productivity, 18 gallons of fuel and $767 annually, according to a TRIP report.

"I'd think it was higher. I feel like I lose half a tank sitting in traffic every week," said Stehli, a West Manchester Township resident who travels to Springettsbury Township four times a week to work as a home health aide.

The TRIP report, authored by Moretti, said Route 30 congestion could be improved with better signal coordination.

"Traffic speeds can be increased by 12 to 25 percent by using coordinated traffic signalization, which improves traffic flow," he said.

The report comes as state lawmakers debate ways to funnel more money toward transportation funding. And some of those recommendations would be carried out if a state transportation bill becomes law, legislators said.

A matter of growth: But only so much can be done to relieve traffic, said Bruce Large, an engineer in Manchester Township.

"If there was a sure-fire way to eliminate heavy traffic, don't you think (Los Angeles) or New York would've thought of it by now? Things could be done to make it a little better, but it won't solve the problem completely," he said.

The number of commuters in Los Angeles and New York dwarfs that of the Harrisburg-York-Lancaster area, but the traffic congestion in those areas is caused by a similar factor: population growth.

"Traffic congestion in the Harrisburg-York-Lancaster region and other urban areas in Pennsylvania has increased because of continued growth in population, without corresponding improvements being made in the state's transportation system," Moretti said.

From 1990 to 2011, Pennsylvania's population increased 7 percent from approximately 11.9 million to 12.7 million, and the population of the Harrisburg-York-Lancaster area reached 1.1 million, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

During the same time period, vehicle travel in the state grew 16 percent, according to PennDOT.

To improve travel conditions for those commuters, TRIP suggests a handful of improvements to expand the regional transportation system: additional traffic lanes and turn lanes, new roads and highway links, additional transit service, and improved sidewalks and bike paths.

Because heavy traffic reduces air quality, a more efficient transportation system would also create a more environmentally-friendly system, Moretti said.

"On a personal level, nobody wants to waste time or waste fuel," he said.

The details: Here are more details on the other most congested commuter routes in York County.

**Better signal coordination could also improve traffic flow between Grantley Road and George Street throughout the Country Club Road/Rathton Road corridor, according to the TRIP report. About 16,000 to 22,000 commuters travel those roads every day, PennDOT said.

Current conditions cost each commuter 50 hours, 21 gallons of fuel and $921 every year, TRIP said.

**For the Mount Rose Avenue and Cape Horn Road/Edgewood Road corridors, additional capacity at intersections is needed to ease congestion, according to the report. Between 17,000 and 23,000 commuters travel daily on Mount Rose Avenue between Wheatlyn Drive and Cape Horn Road, according to PennDOT statistics.

Congestion costs the average commuter 25 hours, 11 gallons of fuel and $460 every year, according to the report.

To improve the area, there needs to be additional capacity at the Route 24 intersection, an additional travel lane and better signal coordination, the report said.

**The Cape Horn Road/Edgewood Road corridor, from Overview Drive to Ruppert Road, needs similar work to ease congestion on the roads, which carry 20,425 commuters every day, according to PennDOT. Costs to a consumer is 25 hours, 11 gallons of fuel and $460 every year, according to the TRIP report.

Conditions would improve if there were additional capacity at the intersection with PA-124 and better signal coordination, the report said.

**The best means of improving conditions along the Church Road/George Street/Emig Road corridor, from Church Road to Busser Road, is still being determined by a transportation study, according to the TRIP report.

The corridor is traveled by more than 15,000 commuters daily and costs the average commuter 17 hours, 7 gallons of fuel and $307 annually.

- Candy Woodall can also be reached at cwoodall@yorkdispatch.com.

The most congested commuter routes are as follows, according to the report. York County routes appear in bold.

1. Rohrerstown Road from Wabank Road to State Street in Lancaster. This congested corridor costs the average rush hour driver 108 hours, 46 additional gallons of gas, and $1,995 annually or $38 weekly

2. US 222 from New Danville Pike to the PA 501/PA 272 intersection in Lancaster. This congested corridor costs the average rush hour driver 75 hours, 32 additional gallons of gas, and $1,381 annually or $27 weekly.

3. I-81 from Walnut Bottom Road to the Dauphin-Lebanon County Line in Harrisburg. This congested corridor costs the average rush hour driver 67 hours, 29 additional gallons of gas, and $1,227 annually or $24 weekly.

4. Marietta Pike (PA 23) from Orange Street to Stony Battery Road in Lancaster. This congested corridor costs the average rush hour driver 50 hours, 21 additional gallons of gas, and $921 annually or $18 weekly.

5. Country Club and Rathon Road from Kings Mill Road to Midland Avenue in York. This congested corridor costs the average rush hour driver 50 hours, 21 additional gallons of gas, and $921 annually or $18 weekly.

6. Loucks Road and Arsenal Road from the PA 74 entrance ramp to the North Hills Road in York. This congested corridor costs the average rush hour driver 42 hours, 18 additional gallons of gas, and $767 annually or $15 weekly.

7. PA 283 from I-76 to I-83 in Harrisburg. This congested corridor costs the average rush hour driver 25 hours, 11 additional gallons of gas, and $460 annually or $9 weekly.

8. US 22 from Herr Street to Mountain Road in Harrisburg. This congested corridor costs the average rush hour driver 25 hours, 11 additional gallons of gas, and $460 annually or $9 weekly.

9. Lititz Pike (PA 501) from Oregon Pike to Newport Road in Lancaster. This congested corridor costs the average rush hour driver 25 hours, 11 additional gallons of gas, and $460 annually or $9 weekly.

10. Mount Rose Avenue (PA 124) from Wheatlyn Drive to Cape Horn Road in York. This congested corridor costs the average rush hour driver 25 hours, 11 additional gallons of gas, and $460 annually or $9 weekly.

11. Cape Horn Road and Edgewood Road from Overview Drive to Ruppert Road in York. This congested corridor costs the average rush hour driver 25 hours, 11 additional gallons of gas, and $460 annually or $9 weekly.

12. I-83 from the Cumberland-York counties line to I-81 in Harrisburg. This congested corridor costs the average rush hour driver 17 hours, 7 additional gallons of gas, and $307 annually or $6 weekly.

13. King and Orange Streets from Broad Street to West End Avenue in Lancaster. This congested corridor costs the average rush hour driver 17 hours, 7 additional gallons of gas, and $307 annually or $6 weekly.

14. Church Road, George Street and Emig Road from Church Road to Busser Road in York. This congested corridor costs the average rush hour driver 17 hours, 7 additional gallons of gas, and $307 annually or $6 weekly.

TRIP is sponsored by insurance companies, equipment manufacturers and businesses involved in highway and transit engineering and construction.

Check back later for more details.