Kevin Schreiber would like to thank, well, everyone.

As of Tuesday night, York City's economic and community development director has a new job.

Schreiber won a special election to become the 95th state House District's newest representative, a job held by Eugene DePasquale until he resigned to take the state auditor general post earlier this year.

In an enthusiastic victory speech outside York County Democratic headquarters, Schreiber thanked his family, friends, voters, DePasquale, former Mayor John Brenner, current Mayor Kim Bracey and practically everyone who'd gathered on the street.

Between high-fives and hugs, Schreiber pumped his fists into the air, his trademark blonde locks glowing in the light of surrounding television cameras.

Kevin Schreiber and his wife Jen arrive at York County Democratic Headquarters after the polls closed Tuesday, May 21, 2013. Schreiber won the 95th
Kevin Schreiber and his wife Jen arrive at York County Democratic Headquarters after the polls closed Tuesday, May 21, 2013. Schreiber won the 95th District race. (Randy Flaum photo - rflaum@yorkdispatch.com)
In the headquarter windows, a campaign sign urged voters to "put the hair in Harrisburg."

"I've got big shoes to fill," Schreiber said. "The work begins tomorrow, and I'm ready."

Schreiber defeated Republican Bryan Tate, vice president of philanthropy at the York County Community Foundation, and Green Party candidate Bill Swartz, a local businessman.

Schreiber earned 3,458 votes, or 53.2 percent, according to unofficial results with all precincts reporting. Tate got 2,518, or 38.7 percent of votes. Swartz earned 521 votes, or 8 percent.

There were nine write-in votes, according to unofficial results.

Up next: What's first for Schreiber?

He'll be sleeping in Wednesday morning, he joked.

"Then we've got to get up and figure out how I'm going to transition from the city to the state House," he said.

Schreiber said he expects to jump right into the state budget process.

During the campaign, voters repeatedly expressed concern about education and jobs, Schreiber said.

He'll be reaching across the aisle and working with the York County delegation, mostly Republicans, to work on those issues, he said. Schreiber said he's planning to join a new bipartisan government reform caucus.

"I'm an individual that likes to get things done," he said.

Tate and Swartz could not be immediately reached for comment Tuesday night.

- Erin James may also be reached at ejames@yorkdispatch.com.