The emotion was palpable as guests arrived at the funeral of fallen Loganville Fire Chief Rodney Miller.

Memories of both his service and death were evident as mourners drove to Grace Fellowship Church in Seven Valleys.

The Seven Valleys Fire Co. was draped in black cloth and used its signage to honor Miller's last call on Saturday.

Miller was directing traffic at the scene of an accident on Interstate 83 near the Glen Rock exit when he was struck and killed by a motorist, who was charged with homicide by vehicle, driving under the influence and other violations.

On Friday morning, local firefighters showed up to direct the traffic arriving at Miller's funeral.

More than 100 fire vehicles arrived, some draped in American flags.

First responders hugged through tears as they entered the church auditorium to see Miller's fire chief's uniform neatly folded next to the speaker's podium, never to be worn again.

"How Great Thou Art" played as about 2,500 guests-most of them local firefighters-filed in, waiting to share and hear final words about the legacy and life of the beloved chief.

The standing-room-only crowd came to its feet and those in uniform saluted as Miller's casket, covered in an American flag, was carried to the front of the room.

A softly-sung version of "Hallelujah" accompanied the processional, and dry eyes were few as a fellow Loganville fireman remembered him.

Miller led by example and earned the respect of his peers, said Ron Werner.

A 29-year veteran of the fire company, Miller first joined as a junior volunteer when he was 16 years old and has served as Loganville's chief for 12 years.

"It didn't take him long to earn the respect of those at the station," Werner said.

Miller was "true to himself and true to others at station 63," he said.

Werner became choked up as he described the man he called "a very good friend."

"Rodney was a fire chief when he had to be and was always a friend with a smile," he said.

Former Loganville Fire Chief Stanley Brown, who owns Brown's Orchard & Farm Market, also described Miller's leadership.

"He understood his responsibilities and wanted his members properly trained," he said.

When Brown heard the fire alerts, he said he felt relieved and confident knowing Miller was answering the call.

Family friend Missy Sweitzer remembered Miller as a man who always put others ahead of himself, always had a smile on his face, had a passion for life and gave the best hugs.

"He was an amazing mentor and we could all learn from his example," she said.

His uncle, Duane Howard, said he will "miss his laughter, that infectious smile."

Rev. Fred Walthour, a family friend and the pastor who presided over Miller's marriage, spoke of the love shared in the fallen chief's family.

He had a family that loved each other and measured that love in hugs, kisses and laughter, Walthour said.

The pastor recalled the beginning of Miller's relationship with Shelly (Keener) Miller, his wife of 21 years.

Miller was the paperboy for her family's home and would often stay a little longer on her porch than that of other customers.

"She asked him once what she could do to help, and he told her, 'Just stand there and look pretty,'" Walthour said.

The attraction was obvious, even in church, when the pastor would notice Miller glancing across the pews at the tall, thin blonde, he said.

Their marriage was one of love and laughter-just like Miller's life, Walthour said.

"Rodney wouldn't want his family to stop having fun," he said.

Several Bible verses were shared, The Lord's Prayer was recited and "Amazing Grace" was played before a tearful recssional carried Miller's casket out of the church, once again moving past a long line of first responders who saluted his service.

Family members embraced and sobbed in the parking lot as his casket was loaded onto a herse, bound for his final resting place in St. Peter's Yellow Church Cemetery in Seven Valleys.

State police closed roads as they directed a long procession of nearly 2,000 vehicles and fire engines, slowly moving past numerous signs bearing Miller's name and paying tribute to the thousands of volunteer hours he spent on call for his York County community.

Previously reportedBoth the family and Loganville Fire Co. released statements on Friday about their loss during the past week. Their messages are below:

From the family of Chief Rodney Miller:

"Seven days ago, our world was changed in an instant when Rodney's life was tragically taken from us. Since then, we have experienced an outpouring of love, support and prayers that has been extremely overwhelming.

"We wish to thank all who have written cards, sent letters, notes of sympathy, visited with us and made donations to honor Rodney's services to our community.

"We wish to express our sincere appreciation for the devotion of the first responders in our community who daily serve our communities by giving tirelessly of themselves to help those in need.

"Rodney's life was one marked with a passion to serve our community and to the individuals who live here. We urge everyone to follow Rodney's example by seeking to serve others just as he did."

From the Loganville Fire Co.:

"Today we grieve the loss of our brother and leader, Chief Rodney Miller. Words simply cannot express the devestation within our fire company. We are still trying to come to grips with the situation.

"His death is a heartbreaking reminder of the dangers faced every day by firefighters throughout this country and around the world. Chief Miller is the 25th firefighter to die in the United States this year in the line of duty. One is too many.

"And while today is certainly one of great sadness, it is also an opportunity to celebrate--to celebrate a selfless public servant whose dedication to helping save the lives of others cost him his own. It is the ultimate sacrifice and will not be forgotten."

Previously reported: The emotion was palpable as guests arrived at the funeral of fallen Loganville Fire Chief Rodney Miller.

Memories of both his service and death were evident as mourners drove to Grace Fellowship Church in Seven Valleys.

The Seven Valleys Fire Co. was draped in black cloth and used its signage to honor Miller's last call on Saturday.

Miller was directing traffic at the scene of an accident on Interstate 83 near the Glen Rock exit when he was struck and killed by a motorist, who was charged with homicide by vehicle, driving under the influence and other violations.

On Friday morning, local firefighters showed up to direct the traffic arriving at Miller's funeral.

More than 100 fire vehicles arrived, some draped in American flags.

First responders hugged through tears as they entered the church auditorium to see Miller's fire chief's uniform neatly folded next to the speaker's podium, never to be worn again.