Peggy Davidson of Spring Garden Township, holds her dog Roxie during the  York County SPCA ground breaking ceremony for the new spay and neuter clinic,
Peggy Davidson of Spring Garden Township, holds her dog Roxie during the York County SPCA ground breaking ceremony for the new spay and neuter clinic, Tuesday, March 12, 2013. Davidson adopted Roxie Monday from the SPCA.The new clinic is will be open to the public August 2013 and will be the only spay and neuter clinic in the state of Pennsylvania. Shelby Seaton photo sseaton@yorkdispatch.com. (Shelby Seaton)

Tuesday's rainy weather might have been dreary, but it didn't stop the York County SPCA from celebrating the groundbreaking of its new high-volume spay/neuter clinic.

About 25 people attended the event -- as well as a handful of dogs and a horse -- under two tents.

The York County commissioners committed $1.6 million over the next 12 years to the animal adoption center in order to decrease the large number of strays in the area.

The current SPCA facility in Manchester Township filled within two weeks of opening, said Kathy King, president of the organization's board of directors. The new clinic is a $1.35 million, 4,000-square-foot project scheduled to open in August 2013.

King said the clinic will enhance the SPCA's spay/neuter program, reducing the number of stray animals over time, thereby reducing the shelter's cost.

Kevin Smith, vice president of the board, said there are 110 Humane Alliance-affiliated clinics across the United states. This will be the first one in Pennsylvania.

"By year's end, we're hoping to perform 35 spay/neuters each day," Smith said.

That comes out to nearly 13,000 each year, a marked increase from the 5,000 procedures King said the organization currently performs yearly.

The cost of the procedures will depend on the animal, he said, but they will be offered at reduced rates. Smith said a dog's procedure would cost around $75, whereas feral cats are treated at much lower rates.

Smith said the organization, is mostly donor-funded, will retrain its current employees and possibly hire a few new ones.

Sue Wagner, a volunteer with the SPCA's equine group, stressed that horses -- 19 of them -- also are up for adoption.

The horses are currently housed in foster homes and have been neglected or abused, but Wagner said the volunteers work and ride with them until they are comfortable.

"Aside from maybe some scars, they are no different," she said.

To adopt a pet from the center, visit ycspca.org and download an adoption application.