A 37-year-old Hanover woman on Wednesday became the county's ninth auto-related fatality this year.

The coroner's office hasn't released the name of the woman involved in Wednesday evening's crash because authorities are looking for a next of kin.

West Manheim Township Police are investigating the two-vehicle crash, which occurred in the 2100 block of Baltimore Pike at about 5:35 p.m., said Chief Tim Hippensteel.

The woman's northbound Buick sedan crossed into the opposing lane and crashed head-on into a southbound Nissan Rogue, Hippensteel said.

She died on impact, while the male driver of the Nissan was transported to York Hospital by helicopter because of serious injuries.

The man, who was also not being identified, was still in the hospital Thursday morning, Hippensteel said.

The man's adult son, who was a passenger in the Nissan, was also being treated at the hospital, he said.

Witnesses reported the Buick was being driven erratically and at a high rate of speed just prior to the collision, Hippensteel said.

York County Deputy Coroner Steve Cosey pronounced the woman dead at the scene. She died of multiple blunt force trauma, and an autopsy will not be performed, Cosey said.

Spike: York County Coroner Barry Bloss said there's a noticeable spike in fatal crashes this year compared to last, during which York posted its lowest number of fatalities in at least 10 years.


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But he said there's no one factor to which the increase could be attributed.

Wednesday's fatal crash came just two days after a Peach Bottom Township woman died when she was thrown from her pickup truck.

Bloss said Kelly Lynn Schurtz, 44, was ejected because she wasn't wearing her seatbelt.

Seatbelt use is one of the best ways to prevent a fatality, he said.

But more people in York County have been buckling up, and that's one reason there were only 30 fatalities in 2012, Bloss said.

That number was the county's lowest in years. There were, for example, 50 fatalities in 2011, 46 in 2010, and 56 in 2009, he said.

The current trend seems to suggest an unfortunate continuation of the trends established in those years, he said.

- Staff writer Greg Gross contributed to this report. Reach Christina Kauffman at ckauffman@yorkdispatch.com.