Ravens fans Rich Scavuzzo and Dawn Marchozzi, both seated, and Al Monks, right, cheer the team’s second touchdown during the Super Bowl on Sunday at
Ravens fans Rich Scavuzzo and Dawn Marchozzi, both seated, and Al Monks, right, cheer the team's second touchdown during the Super Bowl on Sunday at Monks' home in West Manchester Township. (John A. Pavoncello photo)

Al Monks will likely be black and blue and without a voice for the next few days.

When the Baltimore Ravens completed a big play or scored a touchdown, the West Manchester Township fan screamed during a Super Bowl party he and his family hosted Sunday night.

That cheering usually takes a toll on his body, said Al Monks' wife, Lacey.

"It normally takes five days for his voice to come back," she said.

The black and blue marks on Al Monks are from him hitting his chest in excitement, Lacey Monks said.

But the screaming and hitting appear to have worked. The Ravens beat the San Francisco 49ers for their second championship in team history.

Split: Al Monks, who grew up in Maryland, was a Baltimore Colts fan but when the team fled the city early one morning in 1984, he became a 49ers fan.

Snowball, owned by the Monks family of West Manchester Township, sports her own Baltimore Ravens jersey during the family’s Super Bowl party Sunday.
Snowball, owned by the Monks family of West Manchester Township, sports her own Baltimore Ravens jersey during the family's Super Bowl party Sunday. (John A. Pavoncello photo)

When the NFL returned to Baltimore in 1996, Al Monks' pigskin allegiance shifted back to the city.

"For this game I'm definitely rooting for the Ravens," he said while wearing a Ravens jersey.

Memorabilia of the California team hangs on one of the walls of his basement mancave, but the remaining walls are all dedicated to the Ravens.

One wall is painted Ravens purple, and all are mostly covered in signed photographs and framed jerseys of team players.

Al Monks said he gained the memorabilia through his job of organizing and managing autograph appearances for players, including a number of Ravens players.

On shelves in a glass case sit signed helmets and a game-worn cleat signed by retiring linebacker Ray Lewis. As the Super Bowl was showing on two large televisions, a Ravens lamp that looks like a traffic light rotated through the three lights.

"We have so much Ravens stuff that I can't put it all up," he said.

Family affair: The basement tribute to the teams is currently in its third incarnation. Two previous basement floods cause the couple to renovate the space twice.

Each time they repainted a wall purple and rehung the memorabilia.

As family and friends hovered by a bar in front of one the televisions, most of the group cheered as Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco threw for a touchdown late in the second quarter, giving the Ravens a 21-3 lead.

Everyone but Al Monks' in-laws.

Andy and Deb Lentz of Red Lion half jokingly backed the 49ers during the game.

"I'm a (Dallas) Cowboys, (Oakland) Raiders and a 49ers fan in that order," Andy Lentz said.

The Lentz couple sported San Francisco T-shirts and at halftime, Andy Lentz jokingly jabbed Al Monks that the 49ers were on the verge of a second-half comeback.

"We thought it would be good to mix it up," said Deb Lentz.

- Reach Greg Gross at ggross@yorkdispatch.com.