Pat Kline can barely watch "Cold Mountain."

By the end of the 2003 movie, he is exhausted from two and a half hours spent looking for the Confederate soldiers who wear uniforms woven by Kline's family and employees at Family Heirloom Weavers.

It's one of a dozen or so movies that features creations from the Red Lion family business. This week, add Steve Spielberg's "Lincoln" to a list that also includes "Gettysburg," "Gods and Generals," and "Cowboys & Aliens."

In the latest flick, which opens in theaters today, watch for three 19th Century-era ingrain carpets.

"I can't really watch (Cold Mountain) and enjoy it like anyone else because I'm looking for all my stuff," Kline said. "This one won't be as bad because it's only three carpets.

Daniel Day-Lewis, center, as President Abraham Lincoln in the movie  Lincoln.  The film features carpets made by a Red Lion business.
Daniel Day-Lewis, center, as President Abraham Lincoln in the movie Lincoln. The film features carpets made by a Red Lion business. (AP Photo)
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Family Heirloom Weavers recreates designs from the 18th and 19th centuries and weaves fabrics on antique looms. Their work can be found in many museums and presidential homes - including Abraham Lincoln's house in Springfield, Ill.

Kline hasn't yet seen "Lincoln." But, he's been told that one of the carpets woven at Family Heirloom Weavers makes an unmistakable appearance during the sixteenth president's death scene.

Some months back, Kline said he got a call from a set designer requesting "one, big huge carpet."

The order eventually morphed into two 21-feet-by-28-feet carpets and one 12-feet-by-10-feet carpet.

"We don't really solicit the movie people, but they find us anyway," Kline, the company's president, said.

The order for the smallest carpet came much later than the first two, Kline said. Filmmakers wanted a carpet to match the "somber" tone of Lincoln's death scene. But they didn't have much time to spare.

So, Kline said, he sold them a piece that had already been woven. Of course, it's going to bother him just a bit when he sees it in the movie.

Technically, this particular carpet wouldn't have been around during Lincoln's death in 1865. Fabric of its exact shape, texture and color would probably date closer to 1875, Kline said.

But, Kline acknowledged, "You have to be a carpet nerd like me to know that."

- Erin James may also be reached at ejames@yorkdispatch.com.