Keith Shoff of Red Lion swings for the fence at Sovereign Bank Stadium on Thursday as one of the Hall of Shamers, a team participating in the Pennsylvania
Keith Shoff of Red Lion swings for the fence at Sovereign Bank Stadium on Thursday as one of the Hall of Shamers, a team participating in the Pennsylvania Breast Cancer Coalitions fifth annual home run derby. (John A. Pavoncello photo)

Sometimes supporting a good cause is as simple as swinging a bat.

Yorkers stepped up to the plate to compete in the Pennsylvania Breast Cancer Coalition's fifth annual home run derby on Thursday.

Sovereign Bank Stadium was the second of the coalition's eight stops for home run derbies at minor league baseball fields across Pennsylvania.

"It's a nice opportunity to get out on a finely manicured baseball field on a beautiful day and take a swing," said Neil Slenker, 42, who was batting for one of four teams from Peoples Bank in York. "Plus you're supporting a good cause."

Peoples Bank Team Three -- made up of Andy Rosenszwig, Travis Lear, Austin Botts and Brad McCullough -- won the derby with 1,895 points. McCullough alone had 525 points and smacked the only home run all day.

Every hitter got 15 swings from the pitching machine. Infield hits earned 10 points, outfield hits got 25 points, wall hits got 50 points, and hitting a home run was worth 100 points.

The team with the most points received commemorative baseball bats and a prize packet.

"And, of course, they really just want the bragging rights," said Heather Hibshman, executive director of the coalition.

Good turnout: Hibshman said that Harrisburg, York and Lancaster have the best turnouts for the derbies in the state.

The 15 teams in York raised almost $8,000 this year, which will go to breast cancer support programs run by the coalition.

The statewide fundraising goal this year is $100,000 and so far they have raised about $83,000, she said.

The four men of Team Hard Body -- Erik Brough, Chris Carter, Brian Seymour and Josh Walker -- said they struggled a bit at the plate, but still had fun.

Carter, who coined the team's name, said both of his grandmothers are breast cancer survivors, so raising money for the coalition is important.

Announcing for the event on Thursday was Tammy Miller of State College, an 11-year breast cancer survivor who continues to volunteer with the coalition.

"It really makes a difference what they do," Miller said.

She has referred five different family members and friends to the coalition, where they receive information and supporters who remind them they are not going through this alone.

"You won't find a more compassionate group of people," said Miller.

-- Reach Chelsea at 505-5432 or cshank@yorkdispatch.com