Scott and Jennifer Dellinger barely had time to grab their two young sons and flee to the basement of their Moores Mountain Road home when the tornado hit.

They were still on the main floor of their home when Thursday morning's tornado uprooted a huge red oak tree, which crashed through the Dellingers' roof and hit the couple's bed, they said.

"We got up seconds before," said Jennifer Dellinger, 35. "It's right on our bed. My husband probably would've been -- I don't want to think about it."

The National Weather Service confirmed it was a tornado that ripped through northern York County about 5:55 a.m., with wind speeds of 86 mph to 110 mph.

Violent winds snapped and uprooted trees on the Fairview Twp. property of Scott and Jennifer Dellinger Thursday morning. One tree completely destroyed
Violent winds snapped and uprooted trees on the Fairview Twp. property of Scott and Jennifer Dellinger Thursday morning. One tree completely destroyed their 4-year-old son's trampoline. (John Pavoncello)

It cut a swath of destruction about a mile long and 100 yards wide through northern York County, primarily between Roundtop Mountain Resort in Warrington Township and Moores Mountain Road in Fairview Township, according to York County spokesman Carl Lindquist and the National Weather Service.

There were no reported injuries as of Thursday afternoon, according to the county.

The tornado snapped and uprooted trees, some very large. Homes and buildings sustained damage, and thousands of people were left without electric service. By Thursday afternoon, most people's service had been restored, according to Met-Ed and PPL Corp.

'I screamed': Jennifer Dellinger had a chance to peek outside as the tornado tore by, and saw most of the trees in her yard were bent over.

"They were just laying down on their side ... before they snapped," she said. "I screamed."

Scott Dellinger said he grabbed their 4-year-old, his wife grabbed their 1-year-old, and they fled downstairs.

"It sounded like a freight train coming through our house," Jennifer Dellinger said. "It was awful. ... My 4-year-old is still talking about it: 'My daddy's house is destroyed!'"

Everything in the master bedroom is ruined, as are many belongings on that end of the home, Jennifer Dellinger said.

This man was one of many workers cutting and clearing downed trees at Roundtop Mountain Resort on Thursday, April 28, 2011. The National Weather Service
This man was one of many workers cutting and clearing downed trees at Roundtop Mountain Resort on Thursday, April 28, 2011. The National Weather Service said a tornado caused the damage. (John Pavoncello)
That's the portion of the home they recently finished remodeling, she said.

"It makes you sick," Scott Dellinger, 37, said.

Still, the Dellingers said they are fully insured and grateful they escaped unharmed. They'll be staying nearby at Scott's parents house until the home is repaired, Jennifer Dellinger said, and they have a generator to run their refrigerator and fish tank until power is restored.

"I have two very healthy children -- and I'm good with that," she said.

Damage at Roundtop: A few miles away at Roundtop Mountain Resort, the sound of chainsaws filled the air as staffers there worked to clean up tornado damage.

"It could have been worse," said Ron Hawkes, general manager of the resort, as he toured the property Thursday morning.

A tornado with wind speeds in excess of 85 mph destroyed this small storage shed at the Roundtop Mountain Resort on Thursday morning.
A tornado with wind speeds in excess of 85 mph destroyed this small storage shed at the Roundtop Mountain Resort on Thursday morning. (John Pavoncello)

"We dodged a bullet here," marketing director Chris Dudding said. "In general, I think we got lucky."

Workers from Roundtop, as well as workers sent from Ski Liberty and Whitetail Resort, spent the day cutting up and clearing downed trees, Hawkes said, which comprised the bulk of the damage.

Windows smashed: But buildings took a hit as well, he said.

Flying debris smashed windows at Roundtop's lodge and Learning Center. Those buildings and others also lost shingles, rain gutters and siding. The tornado threw outdoor light fixtures to the ground and badly bent a railing on a set of exterior stairs.

"We had a small storage building that basically blew apart," Hawkes said. "There wasn't much inside.

A Roundtop Mountain Resort staff member sweeps up debris left by a tornado that tore through northern York County just before 6 a.m. Thursday.
A Roundtop Mountain Resort staff member sweeps up debris left by a tornado that tore through northern York County just before 6 a.m. Thursday. (John Pavoncello)
"

But Hawkes said the Fireside Pub & Grill will be open as usual Friday and Saturday night, and that the resort will be "in great shape" for a planned wedding reception Saturday. Roundtop's paintball field and ropes course weren't affected, Hawkes said.

Big cleanup: Moores Mountain Road remained closed much of the day while PennDOT crews cleared numerous trees that had fallen across the road. PPL workers were there as well, working to restore electric service to residents.

Neighbor Charles Zellers, 65, said he couldn't believe how quickly PennDOT workers were clearing the road. They even used a leaf blower to get the finer bits of debris.

"You couldn't even see the road earlier," Zellers said. "They did a hell of a job clearing it up."

PPL Corp. spokesman Jim Nulton said crews will work around the clock until all customers in York, Dauphin, Cumberland, Perry and Juniata counties have power restored.

"It's all horrific tree damage," Nulton said.

-- Reach Elizabeth Evans at levans@yorkdispatch.com, 505-5429 or twitter.com/ydcrimetime.