Ashleigh Downin, 11, of Red Lion photographs a car Sunday during the York Biker BBQ and Car Show at Cityview Community Church. Ashleigh is an avid
Ashleigh Downin, 11, of Red Lion photographs a car Sunday during the York Biker BBQ and Car Show at Cityview Community Church. Ashleigh is an avid photographer, and her car show photos are published on the Mason-Dixon Car Club website. Below, Greg Smith of Airville wipes pollen and dust off the fender of his 1930 Model A Ford pickup during the show. (PHOTOS BY John A. Pavoncello — jpavoncello@yorkdispatch.com)

Cityview Community Church has a different kind of Mother's Day tradition.

After a morning service, churchgoers walk outside to find bikers and street-rod enthusiasts. Most of them aren't wearing their Sunday best, but it doesn't matter. They're setting up shop, flipping their kickstands and popping their hoods.

They stay for the afternoon, eating a barbecue feast and sharing stories about their rides as part of the York Biker BBQ and Car Show.

The show comes to Cityview's 25-acre property in Manchester Township on second Sundays from May to September, said Pastor Steve Kurtz.

"As a congregation, people pretty much embraced it," he said.

Greg Smith of Airville wipes pollen and dust off the fender of his 1930 Model A Ford pickup Sunday during the York Biker BBQ and Car Show at Cityview
Greg Smith of Airville wipes pollen and dust off the fender of his 1930 Model A Ford pickup Sunday during the York Biker BBQ and Car Show at Cityview Community Church. (John A. Pavoncello — jpavoncello@yorkdispatch.com)

The mission: The show started as a way to raise money for one of the church's ministries, Casa Angelina, an orphanage in Guatemala, Kurtz said. Cityview, a non-denominational church, sends teams down to help build houses: The orphanage places 15 kids in a home with "house parents" to simulate a household, he said.

Sunday marked the fifth year of the family-friendly shows, which have helped the church raise thousands of dollars for its mission, Kurtz said. Last year, the events raised $1,577 for the orphanage.

It's easier for churches to be isolated than branch out, but engaging people you wouldn't normally talk to is rewarding, he said. Events like this help parishioners meet new people, Kurtz said.


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"That, to me, is a huge value for us," he said.

Kurtz estimated that about 500 to 600 people came to Sunday's show, and more than 100 cars and 100 motorcycles were shown.

The crowd is usually a bit thinner than that on Mother's Day, but a sunny day with highs in the 70s brought more people out than usual, said volunteer Mike Delp.

"This Mother's Day's been good for us," he said.

The cars: The scene was a car enthusiast's dream, with cars from every decade — from old-timey Plymouth coupes to slick Mustangs and a doors-up Delorean — lined up in several rows.

Greg Smith from Airville had one of the oldest cars at the show, a 1930 Model A Ford pickup.

He bought the red pickup in October and did some custom interior work on it. Now instead of a gray seat, it has a sharp tan and red interior.

"People always look at it," Smith said.

A member of the Mason-Dixon Car Club, he'd been to shows before but never had a chance to flaunt his own car until last year.

"Now I've got one to show," Smith said.

It was his first time at the York Biker BBQ and Car Show, and he said it was a fun time and that he might be back.

"I loved it," he said.

Cityview will hold the next show on Sunday, June 8, and drivers will be able to do burnouts — a fan favorite — for a $10 donation.

— Reach Mollie Durkin at mdurkin@yorkdispatch.com.