City detectives work in an area that will eventually be the gym as the 5 million renovation project at the York City Police station continues.
City detectives work in an area that will eventually be the gym as the 5 million renovation project at the York City Police station continues. (John A. Pavoncello — jpavoncello@yorkdispatch.com)

The $5 million project to upgrade York City's police station will be complete by the end of April.

That's a few weeks behind schedule. But, by and large, the project at 50 W. King St. has gone as planned, said Jim Gross, the city's public works director.

Work began in late 2012 to modernize the station with upgrades including new prisoner cells, an updated evidence storage system and flood-proof locker rooms. A state grant is covering the $5 million price tag. The project is not expected to exceed that cost, Gross said.

WellSpan also contributed $600,000 to cover the cost of a police training center, which will serve as a classroom and computer lab for police officers to complete training and continue their education.

A new briefing room for patrol officers is complete as the 5 million renovation project at the York City Police station continues.
A new briefing room for patrol officers is complete as the 5 million renovation project at the York City Police station continues. (John A. Pavoncello — jpavoncello@yorkdispatch.com)

The department's officers and support staff have had to relocate several times inside the building as the project moves along.

"Nothing's happened that we haven't been able to overcome," Chief Wes Kahley said.

Benefits: In fact, there have already been benefits, Kahley said.

For example, officers are using the new locker rooms, where they "don't have to worry about the flooding," Kahley said.

About 75 percent of the project is done, Gross said Tuesday.

There have been a few setbacks, including a new phone system that took longer than expected to install. And, workers found asbestos behind some walls and ceilings in the building, Gross said.

"We were expecting it — probably found more than we were expecting," he said.

Accreditation: Kahley said he will pursue state accreditation of the department when the project is complete. Accreditation is not required but is given to departments with facilities and policies that comply with recognized standards.

The department's policies and procedures are already in compliance, Kahley said.

"We've been working on it for several years now," he said. "We're just waiting for the building to be finished."

Several of the building's floors look "100 percent different than it did before," Kahley said.

"It's exciting because we know what we started with. It's not a Taj Mahal by any stretch of the imagination, but it's 100 percent better than anything we had before," Kahley said.

— Reach Erin James at ejames@yorkdispatch.com.