10 p.m. update: A total number of 27,019 people are still without power in York County.

Of that number, 26,469 are Met-Ed customers and 550 are PPL customers, according to outage reports from the two companies' websites.

For PPL, the largest concentration of customers without power is in Lower Windsor Township, with 484 customers out, according to the company's website.

According to the First Energy Storm Center website, areas with the largest number of Met-Ed customers without electricity included Chanceford Township with 2,035; Springettsbury Township with 2,132; and Shrewsbury Township with 1,503.

7:30 p.m. update: A total 29,613 people are still without power in York County.

Of that number, 28,932 are Met-Ed customers and 681 are PPL customers, according to outage reports from the two companies' websites.

According to the First Energy Storm Center website, areas with the largest number of people without electricity included Chanceford Township with 2,422; Springettsbury Township with 2,149; and Shrewsbury Township with 1,508.

For PPL, the largest concentration of customers without power is in Lower Windsor Township, with 605 customers out, according to the company's website.

6 p.m. update: A total 31,852 people are still without power in York County. Of that number, 31,171 are Met-Ed customers and 681 are PPL customers, according to outage reports from the two companies' websites.

According to the First Energy Storm Center website, areas with the largest number of people without electricity included Newberry Township, with 2,494; Springettsbury Township with 2,075; and Chanceford Township with 2,459.

For PPL, the largest concentration of customers without power is in Lower Windsor Township, with 605 customers out, according to the company's website.

4:15 p.m. update: Met-Ed has restored power to about 1,000 additional customers in the last three hours, reducing the number of customers without power in York County to about 34,700.

Met-Ed has about 39,000 people without power across the state, an indication that York County is hardest hit among its service areas for power outages from Wednesday's storm.

The company's website indicates those outages are scattered throughout the county.

Met-Ed has brought in crews from out of state and has said power should be restored to 99 percent of customers by Saturday night.

PPL reports about 700 York County residents without power.

1:30 p.m. update: Outages are being restored, but there are still 35,778 Met-Ed customers without power.

That's 21 percent of Met-Ed's York County customer base, which includes 172,400 customers.

PPL, which serves 8,000 customers in the county, is reporting 772 outages in the county.

11:30 a.m. update: Met-Ed said 99 percent of York County power outages will be restored by Saturday night.

The utility company has about 2,000 workers in the field working on restoration efforts around the clock, said spokesman Chris Eck.

"We hope to have 90 percent of customers in York County restored by Friday night," he said.

Another 9 percent should be restored by Saturday night, Eck said.

"Some smaller groups of outages will linger into Sunday," he said.

In terms of Met-Ed's service territory in southcentral Pennsylvania, "York County was ground zero for the storm," Eck said.

Most damage was sustained in the county and there are still about 40,000 Met-Ed customers without electricity.

About 950 PPL customers are without power.

Met-Ed is also keeping it's eye on a possible winter storm that forecasters say could dump snow on the region or no accumulation at all, depending on the weather model.

"If it's severe enough, it could pose problems, but we're focusing on the current restoration efforts. If there should be another storm, we already have crews on the ground," Eck said.

Previously reported: Crystal Kauffman struggled with packing in the cold and dark.

"We had no power and it was 57 degrees in the house and getting colder, so we decided we couldn't stay home," said Kauffman, of North Codorus Township. "It was hard packing clothes and medicine in the dark. You don't realize how much you don't know your house until the lights go out."

She and her husband, Clair Kauffman, chose Wednesday to stay overnight at an American Red Cross shelter set up by the organization's York-Adams Chapter at the York County School of Technology in York Township.

No power: The Kauffmans, who had been without power since 6 a.m. Wednesday, were among thousands of York County residents who lost power during the ice and snowstorm that hit the area overnight Tuesday going into Wednesday.

Met-Ed reported widespread damage throughout its 172,000-customer territory in York County. Several hours of sleet and freezing rain left a half-inch of ice on tree limbs and power lines, knocking out electricity to more than 120,000 Met-Ed customers in the region.

As of 8:30 a.m. Thursday, 41,000 Met-Ed customers in York County were still without power, and 1,300 crew members were on the ground working 18-hour shifts, Met-Ed's spokesman Chris Eck said.

"And they'll keep working till it's done," he said.

The widespread nature of the damage lengthens the recovery process, Eck said. He said he expects it to be multiple days for the last customers to see power again.

He compared York to Ohio, which got 10 inches of snow and is much better off because of the lack of ice.

"This was the hardest-hit area," Eck said. "This is ground zero for us in this storm."

At 9:15 a.m., 961 PPL customers in York County were without power, according to the PPL website. The majority of those were in the area of Lower Windsor and Hellam townships and Wrightsville.

Some of those customers could be without power until late Friday, according to Melinda Stumpf, a company spokeswoman. Crews should be able to put a "pretty good dent" in the number of customers without power by Friday night, said Jim Nulton, PPL spokesman.

Stumpf said that early Wednesday, 1,500 customers in the Northern York County area were without power. By 10:30 p.m. that night, only one customer needed power restored, Stumpf said.

Falling trees: As of Thursday morning, there were 40 road closures across York County for downed trees and wires, according to Mike Martin, the York County maintenance manager for PennDOT. Many of the trees knocked down utility wires, he said.

One of those trees fell on a PennDOT dump truck that was spreading de-icer on Interstate 83 near the Emigsville exit early Wednesday morning, according to Martin.

"It fell right on the roof," he said. "It took out the mirror and the side window ... and put a dent in the roof."

The driver escaped injury but was "shook up a little," though he ended up back on the road in a different truck, Martin said.

York is the hardest-hit area when it comes to downed powerlines, said PennDOT spokesman Mike Crochunis.

"We've actually been working around the clock since that Monday storm," he said.

Shelter: People without power are encouraged to go to the Red Cross shelter, which will be available as needed, said shelter manager Steve Appleby.

The shelter opened at 2 p.m. Wednesday, and county residents, including the Kauffmans, started arriving after 6 p.m. because of the darkness and cold, Appleby said.

By 7:30 p.m., close to 10 people had come to the shelter, where they got a warm meal and could watch television to keep up with news about the weather and power outage, he said.

"We want people to come to the shelter," Appleby said. "We want everybody to be healthy. We want everybody to be safe."

- Reach Eyana Adah McMillan at emcmillan@yorkdispatch.com. Reach Mollie Durkin at mdurkin@yorkdispatch.com.