An icy Wednesday was the perfect example of why Stephanie Lacy probably won't be visiting CVS/pharmacy later this year.

CVS Caremark announced Wednesday that it would stop selling tobacco products in its stores by October.

"If it's a day like today, or snowing or raining, why would I want to make a bunch of trips? Wouldn't I just go to Walmart or Walgreens or something," the 22-year-old York resident said.

Lacy is a smoker who has gone to CVS for cigarettes, beauty products and medicine, and is a customer CVS could lose with the change.

"I completely understand why they wouldn't sell cigarettes anymore while they're also selling meds that save lives, but I'll go wherever I can get everything I need," she said.

CVS estimated it will lose about $2 billion in revenue from the change.

James Cerretta, a 41-year-old York Township resident, said that loss could be someone else's gain.

In York Township, CVS is next to Sheetz and near Weis, he said.

"I'll just go to one of those places now. I don't know that a lot of people go to CVS when they want to run out for cigarettes. It's not a big deal. It might be a bigger deal if a gas station stopped selling cigarettes," Cerretta said.

Even though he might not shop at CVS much — and never really did — he said he respected the pharmacy chain's "bold move."

It was a move praised Wednesday by President Barack Obama, the American Cancer Society and Carole Moore, a 57-year-old Spry resident.


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"I feel like I want to go there more now. That's a huge stance to take. To say they care more about health than money is pretty noble and not something you usually hear from a store," she said.

Marybeth Welbaum, a 53-year-old Spring Garden Township resident, also applauded the decision.

"I'm not a smoker, so maybe I'm biased, but it just makes me feel good about shopping at CVS. I hope other pharmacies do the same thing," she said.

Both Walgreen and Rite Aid Corp. representatives said Wednesday that they are always evaluating what they offer customers and whether that meets their needs.

—Reach Candy Woodall at cwoodall@yorkdispatch.com.